RUTGERS UNIVERSITY – CAMDEN

SEARCH RUTGERS

REGISTRATION

TUITION & PAYMENT

COURSE LISTINGS

CALENDAR

STUDENT SERVICES

FACULTY INFORMATION


SUMMER SESSION OFFICE
Armitage Hall, First Floor
311 North Fifth St.
Camden, NJ 08102
856-225-6098
FAX: 856-225-6453
summercm@camden.rutgers.edu





UNDERGRADUATE ARTS AND SCIENCES

ANTHROPOLOGY

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (G) (Cr.3)
50:070:213:Sec.J2:02980 ATG 221
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
McCarty, Patrick
Email: pmccarty@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the Global General Requirement. Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world.

Back to List.


ARTS AND SCIENCES

Internship in Arts and Sciences (Cr.3)
50:090:399:Sec.K1:00909
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Available to students from any academic department; this course requires a minimum of 100 hours in the field (fall and spring); 150 hours (summer), along with additional classroom time on various professional development topics. Students must secure the internship and have it approved by the internship coordinator prior to registering for this course. Academic major credit is available based on approval from several departments.

Internship in Arts and Sciences (Cr.3)
50:090:399:Sec.K2:03109 eCollege
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Online course support fee of $100. Available to students from any academic department; this course requires a minimum of 100 hours in the field (fall and spring); 150 hours (summer), along with additional classroom time on various professional development topics. Students must secure the internship and have it approved by the internship coordinator prior to registering for this course. Academic major credit is available based on approval from several departments.

Back to List.


ASTRONOMY

Descriptive Astronomy (Cr.3)
50:100:306:Sec.A6:00276 BSB 134
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Scheinberg, Michael
Email: michael.scheinberg@rutgers.edu
Satisfies the Natural Science General Requirement. Introduction to astronomy and astrophysics. Emphasis on the solar system and Kepler's Laws, stellar magnitudes, distances, stellar evolution, the galaxy, black holes, and the Big Bang. Recommended for non-science majors; however, numerical examples are used. Students also may be required to participate in a star-viewing program. Occasional short field trips.

Back to List.


BIOLOGY

General Biology I (Cr.3)
50:120:101:Sec.D2:00277 ATG 121
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 11:30am-2:10pm
Sporer-Springer, Ruth
Email: sporers@camden.rutgers.edu
Co-Requisite 50:120:107. Nursing students may take 101 without laboratory. Note special schedule. Principles of biology, including the cellular basis of life, genetics, and evolution.

General Biology Lab I (Cr.1)
50:120:107:Sec.D1:00671 BSB 307
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:00am
Slobodenko, Katarina
Email: kslobo@rutgers.edu
Co-Requisite 50:120:101. Material fee of $40. Laboratory includes techniques such as microscopy, dissection, physiological experimentation, and use of the scientific method.

General Biology Lab I (Cr.1)
50:120:107:Sec.D3:00672 BSB 307
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 2:30pm-5:30pm
Pachucki, Ryan
Email: ryan.pachucki@rutgers.edu
Co-Requisite 50:120:101. Material fee of $40. Laboratory includes techniques such as microscopy, dissection, physiological experimentation, and use of the scientific method.

General Biology II (Cr.3)
50:120:102:Sec.J2:00278 ATG 121
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 11:30am-2:10pm
Quinty, Tim
Email: tquinty@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:101. Co-Requisite: 50:120:108. Note special schedule. Principles of biology, including the morphology, physiology, and development of plants and animals, including man.

General Biology Lab II (Cr.1)
50:120:108:Sec.J1:00673 BSB 307
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:00am
Brownstein, Steven
Email: sb1036@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:107. Co-requisite: 50:120:102. Material fee of $40. Laboratory includes techniques such as microscopy, dissection, ecological observation, experimentation, and use of the scientific method.

General Biology Lab II (Cr.1)
50:120:108:Sec.J3:00674 BSB 307
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 2:30pm-5:30pm
Sayers, Charlene
Email: cwsayers@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:107. Co-requisite: 50:120:102. Material fee of $40. Laboratory includes techniques such as microscopy, dissection, ecological observation, experimentation, and use of the scientific method.

Facts of Life (Cr.3)
50:120:105:Sec.D1:03397 eCollege
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Not normally open to biology or biomedical technology majors. Satisfies the college's natural sciences requirement for nonscience majors. Credit will not be given for both this course and for the course sequence 50:120:1 Introduction (without laboratory) to biological principles. Covers basic concepts involved in understanding the structure, function, and evolution of organisms with an emphasis placed on the application of biological knowledge to problems of man and society. Topics include human nutrition, disease, reproduction and development, genetic engineering, pollution, and conservation.

Basic Botany (Cr.3)
50:120:201:Sec.D2:02992 BSB 118
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Paulson, Tracie
Email: traciep@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 120:105 or another college biology course. Not open to biology majors. Satisfies the Natural Science General Requirement. An introduction to the members of the plant kingdom with emphasis on their structure and function, growth and development, worldwide distribution, ecology, and economic importance. Additional topics include plant biotechnology, herbs and spices, and the origins of agriculture.

Basic Botany (Cr.3)
50:120:201:Sec.J1:03398 eCollege
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Paulson, Tracie
Email: traciep@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 120:105 or another college biology course. Not open to biology majors. Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Natural Science General Requirement. An introduction to the members of the plant kingdom with emphasis on their structure and function, growth and development, worldwide distribution, ecology, and economic importance. Additional topics include plant biotechnology, herbs and spices, and the origins of agriculture.

Understanding Environmental Problems (Cr.3)
50:120:202:Sec.J1:03277 eCollege
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Morgan, Mark
Email: mdmorgan@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the college's natural sciences requirement for nonscience majors. Although open to biology majors, does not satisfy the biology major elective requirement. Discussion and analysis of environmental problems facing the human species. Emphasis on physical and biological principles affecting population growth; resource and energy consumption; and the pollution of the air, water, and land. Alternative solutions to environmental problems discussed in terms of conflicting economic and political values.

Elements of Ecology (Cr.3)
50:120:203:Sec.A1:03278 eCollege
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement.
Morgan, Mark
Email: mdmorgan@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the college's natural sciences requirement for nonscience majors. Although open to biology majors, does not satisfy the biology major elective requirement. Ecology is a study of the interrelations of organisms and their environments. Included are principles of population growth and ecosystem structure and function.

Microbiology and Its Applications (Cr.3)
50:120:211:Sec.H2:05610 FA 108
7/7-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 11:30am-1:20pm
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:253 and General Chemistry II or GOBS Chemistry. Co-requisite: 50:120:212. Primarily for nursing students. Will not satisfy the biology or biomedical technology major requirements. Structure and characteristics of bacteria, viruses, and fungi, with special emphasis on forms pathogenic for humans. Metabolism and genetics of microorganisms and principles of immunology; host-microbe interactions; pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases and their medication.

Microbiology and Its Applications Lab (Cr.1)
50:120:212:Sec.H1:05611 SCI B12
7/7-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:00am
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:253 and General Chemistry II or GOBS Chemistry. Co-requisite: 50:120:211. Primarily for nursing students. Will not satisfy the biology or biomedical technology major requirements. Lab demonstrating principles discussed in the lecture.

Clinical Aspects of Human Genetics (Cr.3)
50:120:231:Sec.A1:05612 BSB 107
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: General Biology I and GOBS Chemistry. For Nursing students only.

Human Genetics (Cr.3)
50:120:311:Sec.A2:05142 BSB 108
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Paulson, Tracie
Email: traciep@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:102. Principles of human heredity. Topics include genetic aspects of health and disease, birth defects, metabolic disorders, modes of inheritance, molecular and biochemical analyses, genomics, and proteomics. Case studies will be discussed.

General Microbiology (Cr.3)
50:120:330:Sec.D2:05143 BSB 109
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Lee, Kwangwon
Email: kwangwon.lee@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:101 and 50:120:107. Structure and characteristics of prokaryotes, eukaryotic microorganisms, and viruses and their metabolism, genetics, ecology, and use in biotechnological applications. Also includes aspects of immunology and the pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases.

General Microbiology Lab I(Cr.1)
50:120:331:Sec.D3:05430 SCI B12
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 2:00pm-5:00pm
Lallier, Brian
Email: blallier@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:107. Co-requisite: 50:120:330. Designed for science majors. When taken with120:330,  satisfies a Biology elective requirement with lab.  Lab Fee of $40. Examines role of microorganisms in their interactions with their environment, the basic structure and characteristics of bacteria with special emphasis on their effects on humans. Microbial metabolism and effects on their growth are examined as well as techniques for identification such as staining, microscopy, and growth media.  Applications in genetics, DNA fingerprinting, bacterial transformation, ELISA, and bacteriophage isolation will be explored.

Animal Histology (Cr.3)
50:120:376:Sec.H1:05144 BSB 305
7/7-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:45am-10:35am
Sayers, Charlene
Email: cwsayers@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:102 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: 50:120:377. Covers the basic structure and function of animal tissues and the organs derived from them.

Animal Histology Lab (Cr.1)
50:120:377:Sec.H2:05145 BSB 305
7/7-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Sayers, Charlene
Email: cwsayers@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:108 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: 50:120:376. Lab fee of $40.00. Laboratory exercises for Animal Histology.

Invertebrate Zoology (Cr.3)
50:120:378:Sec.B1:02630 BSB 134
5/27-7/3 M,Tu,W,Th 8:45am-10:35am
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 4/10/14.
Pre-requisite: 50:120:102 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: 50:120:388. A guided tour of protists and animals without backbones comprising 95 percent of the animal kingdom. Emphasis placed on evolutionary and ecological relationships that make an understanding and appreciation of this diverse group of animals possible.

Invertebrate Zoology Lab (Cr.1)
50:120:388:Sec.B2:02631 BSB 305
5/27-7/3 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Kilic, Jennifer
Email: joberle@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 4/10/14.
Pre-requisite: 50:120:108. Co-requisite: 50:120:378. Lab fee of $40 and dissection kit required. Laboratory exercises designed to introduce students to the 95 percent of all animals without a backbone. Textbooks for the course would be: REQUIRED: Exploring Zoology: A Laboratory Guide by David Smith and Michael Schenk, Morton Publishing: 2009, ISBN:0895827980. OPTIONAL: A Photographic Atlas for the Zoology Laboratory (6th Edition) by Kent Van De Graff and John Crawley, Morton Publishing: 2009, ISBN: 0895828022. Please note that the laboratory also requires a dissection kit.

Circadian Rhythms (Cr.3)
50:120:387:Sec.J2:05154 BSB 107
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Lee, Kwangwon
Email: kwangwon.lee@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:120:102 or permission of instructor. This course will explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which organisms “keep time". Although the existence of biological clocks has been known for close to 3 centuries, it is only in the last 30 years that we have started to understand how these endogenous clocks run. Furthermore, work conducted in the last 10 years has revealed a high degree of conservation in the mechanisms that make clocks run. The course will cover fundamental properties of biological rhythms and cellular and molecular structure of circadian oscillators in many organisms including cyanobacteria, fungi, insects, plants, reptiles, birds, and mammals.

Special Topics in Biology: Field Ecology (Cr.3)
50:120:395:Sec.D1:02267 Pinelands
6/23-7/3 M,Tu,W,Th, F 9:00am-1:30pm
Dighton, John
Email: dighton@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:116. By permission of instructor. Note special schedule. Course taught off-campus at Pinelands Research Station. The course is designed to immerse students in the practicalities of conducting ecological research. The course introduces the basis of a number of sampling methodologies in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and some of the basic statistics needed to design and interpret data from field surveys and collections. The course is hands-on and in the field. The course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:491:Sec.A1:00341
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:491:Sec.D1:00279
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:491:Sec.J1:00409
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:492:Sec.A1:00339
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:492:Sec.D1:00457
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Special Problems in Biology (Cr.BA)
50:120:492:Sec.J1:00280
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: dshain@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. No more than 8 credits can be counted toward the biology major. Designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have demonstrated an aptitude for original work and may wish to undertake special problems.

Back to List.


CHEMISTRY

General, Organic and Biochemistry (Cr.4)
50:160:103:Sec.A1:05153 FA 242
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-12:00pm
Craig, Mary
Email: mrcraig@camden.rutgers.edu
Primarily for Nursing and General Science students. Note special schedule. Introduction to the scope and method of chemistry, concepts of atomic and molecular structure, major theories of chemical change, the development of fundamental laws governing chemical reactions including rates and energies, and an introduction to organic chemistry, with particular emphasis on biologically active compounds.

Chemical Principles I (Cr.3)
50:160:115:Sec.A1:00513 SLH
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:30am
Fazen, Paul
Email: paul.fazen@villanova.edu
Co-requisite: 50:160:125. Pre- or Co-requisite: 50:640:115 or appropriate schore on the math placement examination. Note special schedule. Primarily for students planning to major in the natural sciences or engineering. Introduction to fundamental principles of chemistry; atomic structure; bond characteristics of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; acids and bases; rates of chemical reactions; and chemical equilibria. Study of common elements and their compounds.

Chemical Principles Lab I (Cr.1)
50:160:125:Sec.A2:00515 SCI 103
5/27-6/20 M,W 12:00pm-4:30pm
Anstice, Jinnie
Email: janstice@camden.rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:160:115. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Demonstrates fundamental chemical principles and chemical properties of matter.

Chemical Principles Lab I (Cr.1)
50:160:125:Sec.A3:00516 SCI 103
5/27-6/20 Tu,Th 12:00pm-4:30pm
Anstice, Jinnie
Email: janstice@camden.rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:160:115. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Demonstrates fundamental chemical principles and chemical properties of matter.

Chemical Principles II (Cr.3)
50:160:116:Sec.D1:00514 SLH
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:30am
Fazen, Paul
Email: paul.fazen@villanova.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:115. Co-requisite: 50:160:126. Pre/Co-requisite: 50:640:121 or 130. Note special schedule. Primarily for students planning to major in the natural sciences or engineering. A continuation of Chemical Principles I.

Chemical Princples Lab II (Cr.1)
50:160:126:Sec.D2:00517 SCI 103
6/23-7/18 M,W 12:00pm-4:30pm
Anstice, Jinnie
Email: janstice@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:125. Co-requisite: 50:160:116. Pre-requisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Demonstrates fundamental chemical principles and chemical properties of matter.

Chemical Princples Lab II (Cr.1)
50:160:126:Sec.D3:00565 SCI 103
6/23-7/18 Tu,Th 12:00pm-4:30pm
Anstice, Jinnie
Email: janstice@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:125. Co-requisite: 50:160:116. Pre-requisite for all advanced chemistry courses. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Demonstrates fundamental chemical principles and chemical properties of matter.

Organic Chemistry I (Cr.4)
50:160:335:Sec.A1:00518 FA 110
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:30am
Roche, Alex
Email: alroche@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:116. Co-requisite: 50:160:339. Note special schedule. Introduction, structure and properties, stereochemistry, alkyl halides, nucleophilic substitution and elimination, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, NMR, IR, and MS.

Organic Chemistry Lab I (Cr.1)
50:160:339:Sec.A2:00520 SCI 327
5/27-6/20 M,W 12:00pm-5:00pm
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:116. Co-requisite: 50:160:335. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Introduction to the techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; stereochemistry.

Organic Chemistry Lab I (Cr.1)
50:160:339:Sec.A3:00521 SCI 327
5/27-6/20 Tu,Th 12:00pm-5:00pm
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:116. Co-requisite: 50:160:335. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Introduction to the techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; stereochemistry.

Organic Chemistry II (Cr.4)
50:160:336:Sec.D1:00519 FA 110
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-11:30am
Roche, Alex
Email: alroche@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:335. Co-requisite: 50:160:340. Note special schedule. Ethers and epoxides, conjugated systems, MO theory, aromatic compounds, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldehydes and ketones, amines, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives.

Organic Chemistry Lab II (Cr.1)
50:160:340:Sec.D2:00522 SCI 327
6/23-7/18 M,W 12:00pm-5:00pm
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:339. Co-requisite: 50:160:336. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Multistep synthesis; isolation, identification, and synthesis of natural products; instrumentation techniques.

Organic Chemistry Lab II (Cr.1)
50:160:340:Sec.D3:00523 SCI 327
6/23-7/18 Tu,Th 12:00pm-5:00pm
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:160:339. Co-requisite: 50:160:336. Note special schedule. Laboratory fee of $40. Multistep synthesis; isolation, identification, and synthesis of natural products; instrumentation techniques.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:495:Sec.A1:00447
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:495:Sec.D1:00446
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:495:Sec.J1:00448
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:496:Sec.A1:00449
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:496:Sec.D1:00450
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Research in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
50:160:496:Sec.J1:00451
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: burke@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. In certain exceptional cases, with approval from the chair, these credits can replace up to 3 laboratory credits and up to 4 lecture course credits toward the chemistry major. For the student interested in cooperating in research with a member of the faculty. The student should work out a research project with the instructor before registering for the course.

Back to List.


CHILDHOOD STUDIES

Introduction to Childhood Studies (Cr.3)
50:163:101:Sec.A1:05155 ATG 105
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Maurer, Cynthia
Email: cynthia.maurer@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102. Satisfies the Diversity General Requirement. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of children and childhood, from birth to adolescence. It draws on many disciplines, including anthropology, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, English, history, religion, economics, and biology. Presentation of the field of childhood studies is designed to provide instruction and information to everyone interested in children and childhood, including those directly responsible for ministering to children's needs and those formulating policies affecting their lives and futures. The lectures and the readings have been designed to foster thinking not only about research in the field, but also about the applied, policy, and clinical implications of the research in order to make informed decisions concerning children and youth. Note: This course is reading and writing intensive. Be prepared for weekly reading assignments ranging between several chapters to a whole book.

Introduction to Childhood Studies (Cr.3)
50:163:101:Sec.D6:05156 ATG 105
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Woods, Marcus
Email: marcus.woods@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102. Satisfies the Diversity General Requirement. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of children and childhood, from birth to adolescence. It draws on many disciplines, including anthropology, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, English, history, religion, economics, and biology. Presentation of the field of childhood studies is designed to provide instruction and information to everyone interested in children and childhood, including those directly responsible for ministering to children's needs and those formulating policies affecting their lives and futures. The lectures and the readings have been designed to foster thinking not only about research in the field, but also about the applied, policy, and clinical implications of the research in order to make informed decisions concerning children and youth. Note: This course is reading and writing intensive. Be prepared for weekly reading assignments ranging between several chapters to a whole book.

Childrens Books and Illustrations (Cr.3)
50:163:360:Sec.D1:05157 ATG 105
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Malven, Ellen
Email: ellen.malven@rutgers.edu
This course surveys poetry, prose, drama, and illustrated books for children, primarily from the Anglo-American tradition, over the 300-year history of its development. The study of children's literature constitutes a valuable field of critical inquiry important to understanding literary history, the cultural construction of childhood, the history of childhood, and the development of children's culture and visual literacy. The course will consider techniques and style in writing and illustrating books for young audiences.

Global Childhoods (Cr.3)
50:163:371:Sec.A6:05158 ATG 105
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Bernardini, Stephen
Email: stbernar@camden.rutgers.edu
Considers the 20th and 21st centuries as eras of globalization in which traditional social and familial structures are breaking down. Within this context children's experiences are infused by influences from across the globe. In this course we will examine the extent to which children are impacted by global factors including cultural and religious diversity and hybridity, transnational families, and interethnic relationships. Salient issues will include children's identity in a globalized world, the maintenance or erosion of tradition, the impact of travel, and the impact of globalization on children's cultural worlds. The course will draw upon international examples of globalization and the interrelationships between local and global factors in children's worlds.

Urban Education (Cr.3)
50:163:382:Sec.J6:05159 ATG 106
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Bergere, Clovis
Email: cb615@camden.rutgers.edu
Explores the ways in which urban schools are created as social, cultural, economic, and political institutions. The relationship between schools and their urban environments will be explored, as well as how schools contest or perpetuate inequalities along racial, social class, ethnic, and gender lines. The course will also consider contemporary school reform movements and their contexts.

Understanding Childhood Through Statistics (Cr.3)
50:163:460:Sec.J1:05160 ATG 106
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Dunaev, Jamie
Email: jamie.dunaev@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Introductory Statistics course (50:960:183/283 or 50:830:250) Provides students with the skills necessary to understand, critique, and produce quantitative information concerning children. Childhood is frequently characterized in terms of numbers, charts, correlations, and other means that rely upon the manipulation of quantitative information. Students will learn the strengths and limitations of different methods used to acquire quantitative information about children and childhood, and will also use statistical programs to analyze data and to present results of analyses in readily interpretable displays.

Back to List.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Programming Fundamentals (Cr.3)
50:198:111:Sec.A3:05161 BSB 134
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Hynes, Craig
Email: master@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre/Co-Requisite: 50:640:121,129 or 130. Fundamental concepts of structured programming and algorithmic problem solving: primitive data types, control structures, functions and parameter passing, top-down design, arrays, files, and the mechanics of compiling, running, testing, and debugging programs. These concepts will be taught using the high-level language Python.

Object-Oriented Programming (Cr.3)
50:198:113:Sec.D1:05162 BSB 335
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Chu, Michael
Email: chuhy74@hotmail.com
Pre-requisite: 50:198:111 and 50:640:121/129/130. Principles of object-oriented program design and advanced algorithmic problem solving illustrated through an object-oriented language. Topics include encapsulation and information hiding; classes, subclasses, and inheritance; polymorphism; class hierarchies, and the creation, implementation, and reuse of APIs (application programming interfaces). Extensive practice with designing and implementing object-oriented programs, especially using elementary data structures such as linked lists, stacks, and queues.

Software Engineering (Cr.3)
50:198:323:Sec.A6:05163 BSB 335
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Egen, Dennis
Email: degen@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:198:113 and 171. Principles and techniques for the design and construction of reliable, maintainable, and useful software systems. Software life cycle, requirements specifications, and verification and validation issues. Implementation strategies (e.g., top-down, bottom-up, teams), support for reuse, and performance improvement. A treatment of human factors and user interfaces included.

Special Topics: Fundamentals and Principles of C++ (Cr.3)
50:198:491:Sec.J6:05445 BSB 134
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Sanchirico, Nick
Email: nesan@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:198:113 and 171. Fundamentals and principles of the C++ language. Topics include functions, data types (primitive and compound), I/O, control structures, exceptions, dynamic memory, classes, inheritance & friendship.

Computer Science Internship (Cr.BA)
50:198:497:Sec.T1:03543
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Lun, Desmond
Email: dslun@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. The practical application of computer science knowledge and skills through an approved internship in a sponsoring organization. Arrangements for the internship must be agreed upon by the sponsoring organization and approved by the department before the beginning of the semester. Students should consult the department for detailed instructions before registering for this course.

Back to List.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Criminal Justice in America (Cr.3)
50:202:201:Sec.J1:04995 ATG 105
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Allen, Ross
Email: rea11@camden.rutgers.edu
American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to postconviction and release.

Police and Policing (Cr.3)
50:202:202:Sec.J6:05164 ATG 108
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Howard, Daniel
Email: sgtdah@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201. History and structure of American police; law enforcement, order maintenance, and service functions; police misconduct, unionism, affirmative action, and race relations; and careers in law enforcement.

White Collar Crime(Cr.3)
50:202:326:Sec.B6:05542 JBMDL
5/19-7/7 Tu 6:00pm-8:40pm and Hybrid
DaGrossa, Joseph
Email: jdagrossa@verizon.net
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201. Off campus course held at the Joint Base McGuire, Dix, Lakehurst. Hybrid course in Sakai format with partial online component. History and development of corporate crime, white-collar crime, political corruption, and other "upper-world" crimes. Emphasis on effective strategies for combating this phenomenon.

Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Serial Killers (Cr.3)
50:202:354:Sec.A6:05166 ATG 106 and Hybrid
5/27-6/20 M,Tu 6:00pm-9:40pm
Caputo, Gail
Email: gcaputo@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201 or permission of instructor. Hybrid course using Sakai with partial online component. This course will explore the topic of serial murder, including motivations, methods, and types of killers, serial killer victims, as well as prosecution and social impact of serial homicide. Topics also include gender, race, myth, and the media. Case analysis of serial killers will be a central part of the class. The course incorporates academic and popular literature as well as film and official statistics.

Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Families and the Criminal Justice System (Cr.3)
50:202:355:Sec.A2:05167 ATG 105
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Adalist-Estrin, Ann
Email: ann.adalistestrin@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201 or permission of instructor. This course provides a framework for understanding and responding to the needs of children and families of the incarcerated, focusing on emerging best practices in systems that serve them such as Corrections, Education, and Child Welfare. It will examine the impact of parental incarceration on children at various ages in the context of current studies on brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment and resilience theories. Includes discussion of the impact of race, culture, family dynamics and coping styles in families impacted by the criminal justice system.

Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Jail and Prison Violence (Cr.3)
50:202:356:Sec.D6:05168 ATG 106
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Caputo, Gail
Email: gcaputo@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201 or permission of instructor. This course takes a close look at violence in correctional institutions with a focus on causes and control. Topics include prison and jail rape, gang violence, prison riots, the social world of jails and prisons, and methods to prevent and control violence. Course information is diverse and ddrawn from various sources, including documentary film, inmate writing, federal and state agencies, and academic literature.

Intership/Community Service in Criminal Justice (Cr.BA)
50:202:404:Sec.K1:02748
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201. By permission of instructor. Open to matriculated students in the College of Arts and Sciences (School 50) from all academic departments. Students will receive a letter grade. This course requires a minimum of 150 hours in the field, along with additional classroom time (3 sessions) on various professional development topics. Students must secure the internship and have it approved by the internship coordinator prior to registering for the course. Please contact the Career Center, located in the Lower Level of the Campus Center for necessary forms and help in finding your internship. Special Note: This course is also open to any Class of 2012 graduate from the Camden Campus who would like to use this course to do a post graduate internship. This can be relevant for those students who never had the opportunity to do an internship or for those students planning to attend graduate/professional school in the Fall. Students who wish to do an internship outside the Delaware Valley should register for the internship in Arts and Sciences E-course. For more information on the College of Arts and Sciences Internship Course, visit: http://cc.camden.rutgers.edu/students/finding/CASInternship.html.

Intership/Community Service in Criminal Justice (Cr.BA)
50:202:404:Sec.K2:03542 eCollege
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:202:201. By permission of instructor. Online course support fee of $100. Open to matriculated students in the College of Arts and Sciences (School 50) from all academic departments. Students will receive a letter grade. This course requires a minimum of 150 hours in the field, along with additional classroom time (3 sessions) on various professional development topics. Students must secure the internship and have it approved by the internship coordinator prior to registering for the course. Please contact the Career Center, located in the Lower Level of the Campus Center for necessary forms and help in finding your internship. Special Note: This course is also open to any Class of 2012 graduate from the Camden Campus who would like to use this course to do a post graduate internship. This can be relevant for those students who never had the opportunity to do an internship or for those students planning to attend graduate/professional school in the Fall. Students who wish to do an internship outside the Delaware Valley should register for the internship in Arts and Sciences E-course. For more information on the College of Arts and Sciences Internship Course, visit: http://cc.camden.rutgers.edu/students/finding/CASInternship.html.

Back to List.


ECONOMICS

Microeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:102:Sec.A1:05169 ATG 220
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Vaden, Robert
Email: robert.vaden@rutgers.edu
Economic systems; supply, demand, and role of the market; consumer behavior and utility; firm behavior, cost, and profit; competitive and monopolistic markets for products and inputs; government regulation of markets.

Microeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:102:Sec.D1:05170 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Dasari, Babu
Email: babu.dasari@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Economic systems; supply, demand, and role of the market; consumer behavior and utility; firm behavior, cost, and profit; competitive and monopolistic markets for products and inputs; government regulation of markets.

Microeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:102:Sec.D2:05172 ATG 106
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Chiu, I-Ming
Email: ichiu@camden.rutgers.edu
Economic systems; supply, demand, and role of the market; consumer behavior and utility; firm behavior, cost, and profit; competitive and monopolistic markets for products and inputs; government regulation of markets.

Microeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:102:Sec.J1:05173 Sakai
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Dasari, Babu
Email: babu.dasari@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Economic systems; supply, demand, and role of the market; consumer behavior and utility; firm behavior, cost, and profit; competitive and monopolistic markets for products and inputs; government regulation of markets.

Macroeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:103:Sec.A2:05171 ATG 221
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Brown, Jonathan
Email: jbrown.econ@rutgers.edu
National income and how it is determined; consumption, investment, and government spending; the monetary system; control of inflation and unemployment; international exchange; alternative economic systems.

Macroeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:103:Sec.D1:05174 ATG 220
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Vaden, Robert
Email: robert.vaden@rutgers.edu
National income and how it is determined; consumption, investment, and government spending; the monetary system; control of inflation and unemployment; international exchange; alternative economic systems.

Macroeconomic Principles (Cr.3)
50:220:103:Sec.J2:05175 ATG 105
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Morelli, Michael
Email: michael.morelli@rutgers.edu
National income and how it is determined; consumption, investment, and government spending; the monetary system; control of inflation and unemployment; international exchange; alternative economic systems.

History of Economic Thought (Cr.3)
50:220:210:Sec.J2:05176 ATG 220
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Hamed, Osama
Email: hamed@camden.rutgers.edu
Examines the development of economic thought to its present state, with emphasis on present-day shapers of economic thought and analysis, linking historical economic ideas to current issues.

Managerial Economics (Cr.3)
50:220:308:Sec.J1:05178 Sakai
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Brown, Jonathan
Email: jbrown.econ@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:220:102 or 103 or permission of instructor. Online course support fee of $100. Application of economic analysis to practical managerial decision making. Course demonstrates the use of contemporary economic tools and techniques in actual managerial problems relevant to market demand and supply, revenue, costs, profits, optimal pricing, capital budgeting, and product line analysis.

Econometrics (Cr.3)
50:220:322:Sec.H6:05179 BSB 336
7/7-8/13 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Chiu, I-Ming
Email: ichiu@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisites: 50:220:102 and 50:220:103 and 50:960:283. An introduction to model building and testing, measurement problems, and the application of statistical methods in economics, business, and related social sciences.

Financial Markets and Institutions (Cr.3)
50:220:325:Sec.J6:05180 ATG 221
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Candalla, Carlo
Email: candalla@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:220:103 or 103. Roles of banks, insurance companies, investment companies, finance companies, pension funds, credit unions, and such institutions in financial markets, and their impact on how the economic and financial systems function. Lending and borrowing activities, investment portfolio policy, and regulatory environment of each type of financial intermediary examined.

Economic Development (Cr.3)
50:220:339:Sec.A1:05182 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Dasari, Babu
Email: babu.dasari@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:220:103 or 103. Online course support fee of $100. Economic and social problems of developing countries: poverty, low savings, inadequate investments, unemployment, inflation, and the transfer of technology, and such social problems as education, health, and administration. Examines development theories models and notes interdependence between developing economies and developed countries, particularly with respect to trade, capital and labor movements, and the transfer of technology.

Economics of Investment and Capital Markets (Cr.3)
50:220:363:Sec.D1:05183 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Candalla, Carlo
Email: candalla@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:220:103 or 103. Online course support fee of $100. Analysis of economic investment by using economic tools: value of firms, economic efficient frontier, lending and borrowing, utility analysis and investment selection, market interest rates, correlation structure of security returns, short- and long-term international investments with foreign risks, capital asset pricing model, efficient markets, and investment decision management.

Special Topics in Economics: Economics of Beer (Cr.3)
50:220:367:Sec.D6:05185 ATG 108
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Pascale, Guy
Email: pascale@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisites: 50:220:102 and 50:220:103. A brief economic history, including the role of beer in Medieval European public finance, government regulation, consumer protection, and public health, serves as an introduction for the course. Further, the historical impact of technologic change on brewery production, organization, and marketing, is also reviewed. The course also addresses economic issues of modern brewing, including: the evolution of the Belgian beer market during the 20th Century, the impact of industry consolidation and export growth on consumer choice, and the role of brewing in developing markets (India, China, Africa, etc.).

Back to List.


ENGLISH

English Composition I (Cr.3)
50:350:101:Sec.D2:05186 ATG 207
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Torres, Seve
Email: sevetorres@gmail.com
Pre-requisite: Satisfactory score on the New Jersey College Basic Skills Placement Test or successful completion of 50:350:099. Instruction and practice in writing expository prose, including a documented research report.

English Composition II (Cr.3)
50:350:102:Sec.D3:01080 ATG 106
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Delany, Kate
Email: kdelany@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:101. Instruction and practice in writing expository prose, including a documented research report.

English Composition II (Cr.3)
50:350:102:Sec.J3:05187 ATG 207
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Miller, Michael
Email: michmill@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:101. Instruction and practice in writing expository prose, including a documented research report.

Literature in English I (Cr.3)
50:350:221:Sec.A6:05188 ATG 207
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Meredith, Joseph
Email: jmeredit@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Open only to English majors. Historical survey of literatures written in English (primarily British and American literatures) from the Middle Ages through 1660.

Literature in English II (Cr.3)
50:350:222:Sec.D2:03365 ATG 208
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Habib, M.A. Rafey
Email: mhabib@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Open only to English majors. Historical survey of literatures written in English (primarily British and American literatures) from 1660 to 1900.

World Masterpieces I (C) (Cr.3)
50:350:238:Sec.A1:03163 ATG 207
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Habib, M.A. Rafey
Email: mhabib@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Satisfies the Civilizations and Heritages General Requirement. Studies in great works of world literature from antiquity to the early modern era.

World Masterpieces I (C) (Cr.3)
50:350:238:Sec.D6:05189 ATG 207
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Fitter, Christopher
Email: fitter@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Satisfies the Civilizations and Heritages General Requirement. Studies in great works of world literature from antiquity to the early modern era.

World Masterpieces I (C) (Cr.3)
50:350:238:Sec.J1:03165 Sakai
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Meredith, Joseph
Email: jmeredit@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online support fee of $100. Satisfies the Civilizations and Heritages General Requirement. Studies in great works of world literature from antiquity to the early modern era.

Shakespeare II (Cr.3)
50:350:332:Sec.D1:05190 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Farquhar, John
Email: johnfar@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online support fee of $100. A study of the plays of the Jacobean period (from 1603 on), with particular emphasis on the tragedies.

Modern British Fiction (Cr.3)
50:350:358:Sec.A2:05191 ATG 223
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Vial, Anne
Email: vial@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Development of the modern novel through examination of the works of the major writers of the century, with emphasis on Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Beckett.

Literature of Childhood (G) (Cr.3)
50:350:360:Sec.J6:05192 ATG 207
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Guedon-Deconcini, Christine
Email: deconcin@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. A study of classic and contemporary literature read and enjoyed by children and adolescents, including fairy tales, folklore, fantasy, picture books, chapter books, the adolescent novel, and poetry.

Special Topics in English Literature: Historical Novel (Cr.3)
50:350:391:Sec.A6:05193 ATG 219
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Fitter, Christopher
Email: fitter@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Cross-listed with 56:350:594:A6. We will read all, or sections of, the following five novels, moving from the Trojan War through Greek democracy, the conquests of Alexander, the Roman Republic, and Roman Christianity, in the following order: Cassandra, by Christa Wolf; The Last of the Wine, Mary Renault; The Virtues of War, Steven Pressfield; Imperium, Robert Harris; Julian, Gore Vidal. Since it may prove impractical for all students to read all the texts, key sections for reading prior to class discussion will be given out by the instructor.

Special Topics in Literature: Women's Literature (Cr.3)
50:350:393:Sec.D3:05194 ATG 208
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Guedon-Deconcini, Christine
Email: deconcin@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. In this course we will read, analyze and discuss various literary works by women writers, attending to aspects such as formal elements, language/voice, the female body, mothers and daughters, identity and difference, and political “resistance" writing. Our course will examine diverse genres, including essays, short stories, plays, and poems, as well as feminist theory. Historically and geographically, we will cover a wide range, reading works from ancient Greece to contemporary America, with a concentration on the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. Our readings highlight the diversity of women’s writing, featuring aristocratic English women, slaves, middle-class Americans, feminists, lesbians, Latinas, and women with hyphenated identities, such as Asian-American and African-American.

Special Topics in Literature: Poetry of Modernism and Post Modernism (Cr.3)
50:350:394:Sec.H6:05195 ATG 218
7/7-8/13 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Barbarese, Joseph
Email: barbares@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Cross-listed with 56:350:593:H6. An in-depth study of poetic developments in English and American poetry from Yeats to the present, the course begins with an overview of the backgrounds of Modernism in Whitman and Tennyson and the Romantics, then confronts the poetry of the High Modernists (Yeats, Pound , Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Lawrence, Hart Crane), and continues past mid-century into Post-Modernism, with readings in Ginsberg, Plath, Ashbery and others. We will place emphasis on the philosophical and political contexts of the writers. A particular interest of the course, informed by the candidacy examination reading lists, is in the long poem—from The Waste Land, “Sunday Morning," portions of The Cantos, and The Bridge up to and including Ginsberg’s “Howl," Ashbery’s “The Skaters" and Ammons’ Tape for the Turn of the Year. We will also attempt to produce a synthetic view of the Romantic and the Modernist periods as reflected in criticism of the past two decades. Two papers and a class presentation.

Special Topics in Literature: Great Literary Origins (Cr.3)
50:350:397:Sec.H7:05429 JBMDL
7/7-8/18 M 6:00pm-9:05pm and hybrid
Farquhar, John
Email: johnfar@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Course offered off-campus at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurts. Hybrid course with partial online content. Note special schedule. A survey, within their historical contexts, of some of the renowned texts of world literature from the ancient classics through the Middle Ages. It is my aim to show that each one of these texts is actually interesting and entertaining, as well as being a masterpiece. I hope you will get from the class a better understanding of the value of these texts and the civilizations that produced them. Textbook: Lawall, et al, ed. The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces Vol. 1, Eighth Edition. Norton, 2006.

Internship in English (Cr.3)
50:350:497:Sec.K1:02271
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Normally limited to English Majors. Application of English skills in a volunteer or professional employment setting. Individually designed and evaluated experience under supervision of intern adviser. Commitment of at least 100 hours.

AMERICAN LITERATURE

African-American Literature II (D) (Cr.3)
50:352:251:Sec.A2:05196 ATG 205
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Green, Keith
Email: keigreen@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Satisfies the Diversity General Requirement. Survey of African-American literary production from the Civil War to the early 21st century.

Special Topics in American Literature: Hip Hop in Film and Literature (Cr.3)
50:352:391:Sec.A3:05197 ATG 207
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Rosal, Patrick
Email: patrick.rosal@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. In this course we will make a brief survey of the history and roots of hip hop and then examine texts and films inspired by the hip hop era.

Special Topics in American Literature: Children and Television (Cr.3)
50:352:392:Sec.D2:05198 ATG 205
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Maurer, Cyndi
Email: cmaurer@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. This course will examine the theoretical, historical and contemporary issues of children’s television (including educational and entertainment aspects). It will look at the role television has played in the constructed nature of the child viewer in relation to topics such as digital integration and viewership, the child’s ability to differentiate between reality and fantasy, and the change in reception of television for children in general. Particular focus will be placed on children’s television shows, genre changes, and networks and how they have constructed and influenced the child in multiple ways as well as hallmark moments in the history of children’s television. Viewings may include but are not limited to: Sesame Street, Mister Roger’s Neighborhood, Spongebob Squarepants, Hannah Montana, Rugrats, Pete & Pete, Saved By The Bell, Dawson’s Creek, and The Vampire Diaries.

Special Topics in American Literature: Art of Dr. Seuss (Cr.3)
50:352:393:Sec.A1:05199 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Hoffman, Tyler
Email: thoffman@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course support fee of $100. In this course, we will read most of Dr. Seuss’s (Theodor Geisel’s) books and seek to understand them in cultural context. We also will examine closely the language and sound effects of his texts and their impact on children.

Major Writers of America (Cr.3)
50:352:436:Sec.D6:05200 ATG 226
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Singley, Carol
Email: singley@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Cross-listed with 56:352:593:D6. Selected major writers of fiction and nonfiction such as Rowlandson, Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Poe, Douglass, Zitkala-Ša, Melville, Wharton, Faulkner, Silko, with attention to literary form and historical and Transatlantic contexts. We begin with the Puritans and continue through the post-modernists, examining relationships among writers and developments in American literary and cultural traditions. All works on the syllabus are drawn from the M.A. Candidacy Exam reading lists. An oral presentation, a short paper, and a longer paper.

FILM STUDIES

Studies in Film Genre: Horror Film (Cr.3)
50:354:396:Sec.D1:05201 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Sorrento, Matthew
Email: film@identitytheory.com
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course support fee of $100. This course will cover the history of horror, a dynamic though misunderstood tradition in cinema. After beginning with the horror film's first appearances in American and German silent film, this survey will trace the genre's development in the early Hollywood studio system up through contemporary treatments. We will analyze how cinematic/cultural movements and historical eras have informed horror movies, and how landmark films – including Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Hitchcock's Psycho, Romero's Night of the Living Dead, among others – have revised the genre. This survey will also consider the artistry of trademark directors, screenwriters, and performers through required screenings, online discussion, and close analysis.

WRITING

Writing Public Arguments (W) (Cr.3)
50:989:300:Sec.A1:05270 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Haeflinger, Michael
Email: mikehaef@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Writing General Requirement. Intensive study and practice in the rhetoric of argument; emphasis on composing persuasive texts addressing the public on a range of issues.

Art of Revision (W) (Cr.3)
50:989:301:Sec.D1:05271 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Durborow, Christina
Email: christina.durborow@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Writing General Requirement. Intensive practice in composing and revising texts with an emphasis on developing audience awareness and a clear, fluid style.

Business Writing (W) (Cr.3)
50:989:303:Sec.D1:05272 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Fiske, Shanyn
Email: fiske@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Writing General Requirement. Intensive study and practice in organizational communication; emphasis on workplace genres including correspondence, reports, presentations, and employment documents.

Introduction to Creative Writing (Cr.3)
50:989:305:Sec.J1:05273 Sakai
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Roskos, Evan
Email: evan.roskos@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course fee of $100. Introduction to the writer's craft that surveys available genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

Special Topics in Writing: Writing from Life (Cr.3)
50:989:390:Sec.A1:05274 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Grodstein, Lauren
Email: grodstein@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:350:102 or 220. Online course fee of $100. This course encourages students to use their own memories to create fiction, nonfiction, and other literary forms. Students will read personal reporting covering a wide range of experiences, including war, travel, illness, heartbreak, and parenting, and learn ways to distill their own lives into narrative. Students are responsible for submitting four short pieces (3– 5 pages) addressing episodes in their own lives, as well as posting Sakai responses to their reading.

Advanced Writing (Cr.3)
50:989:401:Sec.D1:00360
6/23-7/1 Time by arrangement
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permision of instructor. Note special schedule. The 29th Annual SUMMER WRITERS' CONFERENCE, June 23-July 2, is an intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner, zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu.

Advanced Writing (Cr.3)
50:989:402:Sec.D1:00281
6/23-7/1 Time by arrangement
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permision of instructor. Note special schedule. The 29th Annual SUMMER WRITERS' CONFERENCE, June 23-July 2, is an intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner, zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu.

Back to List.


FINE ARTS
includes VISUAL ART, ART HISTORY, MUSIC, APPLIED MUSIC, SPEECH, THEATER ARTS

VISUAL ART

Introduction to Studio Art (Cr.3)
50:080:101:Sec.H1:02982 eCollege
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
Garrity, Bruce
Email: bgarrity@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Art majors may not take for credit. Introduction to concepts and processes of making art. Studio projects complemented by lectures and discussions on ways of looking at art, both past and present. Emphasis on the development of each student's creative capacities and awareness.

Ceramics I (Cr.3)
50:080:211:Sec.J3:02983 FA 103
7/21/8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Kelly, Ryan
Email: pietmondrian@hotmail.com
Pre-requisite: 50:080:102 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with 50:080:212:J3. Material fee of $40. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. A dynamic, hands-on exploration of clay. Covers slab building, hand building, figurative work, surface treatment, glazing techniques, and the firing process.

Ceramics II (Cr.3)
50:080:212:Sec.J3:03483 FA 103
7/21/8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Kelly, Ryan
Email: pietmondrian@hotmail.com
Pre-requisite: 50:080:211 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Cross-listed with 50:080:211:J3. Material fee of $40. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. A continuing exploration of concepts and materials and techniques in ceramics, emphasizing advanced hand building, figurative work, mold making, and glaze techniques.

Introduction to Computer Graphics (Cr.3)
50:080:213:Sec.D6:05136 FA 119
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Hohing, Ken
Email: khoning@camden.rutgers.edu
Materials fee of $40.00. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Entry-level design course that provides students with technical skills and computer literacy to implement and produce graphic solutions. The course will provide an overview of Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign.

Drawing I (Cr.3)
50:080:221:Sec.D6:05137 FA 238
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Filbert, Jeffrey
Email: jfilbert@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre/Co-Requisite: 50:080:102 or permission of instructor. This course is pre-requisite to all upper-level studio classes. Materials fee of $40.00. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Drawing as independent art form and personal statement. Stresses both disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative composition and explores a variety of media.

Photography Workshop: Landscape through the Lens (Cr.BA)
50:080:263:Sec.A1:05138 Water Gap
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement. Trip second week in June.
Hohing, Ken
Email: khoning@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Trip to Delaware Water Gap as well in pre- and post-trip in-class meetings. There will be additional accommodation and materials fees. Contract instructor for more information. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. An intensive on-site workshop designed to satisfy the general education Art requirement for non-art majors as well as provide art majors with advanced instruction in photography and student proposed projects. The course consists of a 7 day residence in the Delaware Water Gap area of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and pre- and post-trip seminars. No pre-requisite. 10 student maximum. Accommodations will be approximately $150. Students will meet once on campus before the trip for informational purposes. The trip will be during the second week of June, dates as yet to be determined. There will then be a closing review session on campus after the trip. Contact the instructor for further details.

Digital Photography I (Cr.3)
50:080:264:Sec.J6:00993 FA 113
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Hohing, Ken
Email: khoning@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:080:102 or permission of instructor. Materials fee of $40.00. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Digital Photography I is an introductory studio course in the medium of digital photography. This course offers a basic knowledge of the digital process, including camera operation, exposure, photo printing, web hosting, and preparing a final portfolio. State-of-the-art Adobe photo editing software will be utilized. Students are expected to provide their own camera.

Individual Study in Studio Art (Cr.BA)
50:080:391:Sec.T1:02400
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: one course in advanced studio work. By permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Senior art major expected to further investigate the chosen area of emphasis; projects and research initiated by the student and approved by the faculty. Guidance and criticism offered by department staff, with occasional critiques by outside artists.

Special Topics in Art: Introduction to the Pottery Wheel (Cr.BA)
50:080:479:Sec.J3:05139 Off-Campus
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Filbert, Jeffrey
Email: jfilbert@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Off-campus course at 305 Benson St. in Camden. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Material fee of $35. The class will cover everything you need to get started making your own glazed ceramic ware, from throwing the clay, to trimming, to making lids and handles. The class will consider both functional and non-functional work. We will look at the opportunities of manipulating the clay before firing with stamps, sgraffito, and sculptural additions. Studying various glaze applications we will further explore ceramic design. Food safe glazes will be used. The class will be held at Prof. Filbert’s Studio five blocks from campus at 305 Benson St. Street parking.

Special Studio Projects: Art in the Landscape (Cr.BA)
50:080:484:Sec.A1:02343 Water Gap
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement. Trip second week in June.
Garrity, Bruce
Email: bgarrity@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Trip to Delaware Water Gap as well in pre- and post-trip in-class meetings. There will be additional accommodation and materials fees. Contract instructor for more information. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. An intensive on-site workshop designed to satisfy the general education Art requirement for non-art majors as well as provide art majors with advanced instruction in painting and drawing, and student proposed projects. The course consists of a 7 day residence in the Delaware Water Gap area of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and pre- and post-trip seminars. No pre-requisite. 10 student maximum. Accommodations will be approximately $150. Students will meet once on campus before the trip for informational purposes. The trip will be during the second week of June, dates as yet to be determined. There will then be a closing review session on campus after the trip. Contact the instructor for further details.

Special Topics in Art: Game Design and Theory (Cr.BA)
50:080:489:Sec.A2:05140 FA 113
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Fisher, Ebon
Email: Fisher@nervepool.net
Pre-requisite: Experience with video is suggested/helpful. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. This course introduces students to creative ways to approach game creation. After an inquiry into classic board and school yard games, we will develop unique proposals for interactive digital experiences and produce a demonstration of the game using video, live action and motion graphics. Our goal is to imagine the possibilities for new kinds of games and immersive digital experiences. METHODS & ASSIGNMENTS: Experimental Game Design & Theory combines a survey of games throughout history with hands-on, innovative game design projects. Students work in teams to research a weekly topic, then in the second half of the course, design a new kind of interactive digital experience. Students demonstrate their game concept with video and other media of their choice such as live action, motion graphics, and if available, 3D animation.

Special Topics in Art: Visual Fundamentals (Cr.BA)
50:080:490:Sec.B6:05141 JBMDL
5/19-7/2 M,W 6:00pm-9:05pm
Filbert, Jeffrey
Email: jfilbert@camden.rutgers.edu
Off-campus course at JBMDL. Satifies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Consideration of formal elements, color theory, and principles of organization employed in two-dimensional work. Emphasis on communicating ideas through a variety of media.

Back to List.


ART HISTORY

Introduction to Art History I(G) (Cr.3)
50:082:101:Sec.A1:05311 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Rodriguez, Anabelle
Email: anabelle.rodriguez@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Global Studies or Fine Arts general requirement. A chronological survey of the visual arts as an expression of the mind and culture of Western civilization covering prehistoric, Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval art and architecture.

Introduction to Art History I(G) (Cr.3)
50:082:101:Sec.D1:05563 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Rodriguez, Anabelle
Email: anabelle.rodriguez@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Global Studies or Fine Arts general requirement. A chronological survey of the visual arts as an expression of the mind and culture of Western civilization covering prehistoric, Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval art and architecture.

Introduction to Art History II(G) (Cr.3)
50:082:102:Sec.D1:05327 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Rodriguez, Anabelle
Email: anabelle.rodriguez@rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 4/14/14.
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Global Studies or Fine Arts general requirement. A chronological survey of the visual arts as an expression of the mind and culture of Western civilization covering early Renaissance through the 20th century.

Introduction to Art History II(G) (Cr.3)
50:082:102:Sec.J6:05328 FA 217
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Rodriguez, Anabelle
Email: anabelle.rodriguez@rutgers.edu
Satisfies the Global Studies or Fine Arts general requirement. A chronological survey of the visual arts as an expression of the mind and culture of Western civilization covering early Renaissance through the 20th century.

Art Appreciation (G) (Cr.3)
50:082:103:Sec.B1:02986 eCollege
5/27-7/3 Time by arrangement
Garrity, Bruce
Email: bgarrity@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Global Studies or Fine Arts general requirement. Introduces the principles, techniques, and approaches to the creation and analysis of works of art and presents an overview of the great landmarks of art from classical Greece through the 20th century.

Individual Study in Art History (Cr.BA)
50:082:491:Sec.T1:01242
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: junior or senior standing, written permission of instructor and student's adviser. At least three credits of individual study are required of art history majors. May be repeated for credit. A course for advanced students in which a program of research is conducted by the student under the direction of the instructor. A significant list of readings in art history methods and a substantial paper required.

Back to List.


MUSIC

Facing the Music (G) (Cr.3)
50:700:201:Sec.A1:05219 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Zaki, Mark
Email: mark.zaki@rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts or Global General Requirement. Set against the idea of music as a reflection of society, this course introduces and traces the main elements of Western music, and how they develop and change throughout history. Students will examine various aspects of music that define style, genre, and period and develop the vocabulary to discuss them. No prior musical knowledge is required, but an enthusiasm for all kinds of music will be helpful.

Facing the Music (G) (Cr.3)
50:700:201:Sec.J1:05220 Sakai
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Zaki, Mark
Email: mark.zaki@rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts or Global General Requirement. Set against the idea of music as a reflection of society, this course introduces and traces the main elements of Western music, and how they develop and change throughout history. Students will examine various aspects of music that define style, genre, and period and develop the vocabulary to discuss them. No prior musical knowledge is required, but an enthusiasm for all kinds of music will be helpful.

Introduction to Music (Cr.3)
50:700:202:Sec.A1:03234 eCollege
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Polack, Eric
Email: epolack@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. An approach toward music appreciation that emphasizes the cultural influences that have determined the varied musical languages throughout the world.

Sound Thinking (Cr.3)
50:700:301:Sec.D1:05221 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Zaki, Mark
Email: mark.zaki@rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. Sound Thinking: Music in the Digital Era is an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of digital music and sound art. Focusing on the impact of technology and its aesthetic and social implications, students will be introduced to tools and techniques from a wide spectrum of musical forms and aesthetic practices. The course also addresses music and sound within the context of emerging trends in new technologies, including computer games, the internet, and mobile media. In addition to regular course work and reading, students are required to complete a significant final project that engages creative music or sound art, practical experimentation, or contextual research.

Rock and Roll (Cr.3)
50:700:306:Sec.A6:05223 FA 229
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Smith, Robert
Email: rob.smith@rutgers.edu
This course will examine the history of rock and roll and the artists that greatly influenced American culture. In addition to class assignments, the final project will include a major research paper due at the end of the term. The course is offered in eCollege and will be available to students opening day of class. General course information, such as required text(s), can be found beforehand at sakai.rutgers.edu

American Music of the 1960's (Cr.3)
50:700:310:Sec.J1:05224 eCollege
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Lally, Laurie
Email: llally@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. This course will examine the musical response to a society in political and cultural unrest. Topics such as segregation, integration and the Vietnam War will be covered. The protest music of artists such as Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and Pete Seeger will be reviewed as well as other artists from the folk revival period. The course is offered in eCollege and will be available to students opening day of class. General course information, such as required text(s), can be found beforehand at sakai.rutgers.edu

Introduction to Conducting (Cr.2)
50:700:329:Sec.A2:05222 FA 224
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-12:30pm
Zavadsky, Julia
Email: zavadsky@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:700:225. Primarily for majors in the Institute for Effective Education. Development of the skill of conducting is the main goal. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of conducting technique for both choral and instrumental organizations. By the end of the course, students should be able to conduct an ensemble using the basic beat patterns and emphasizing communication of the inherent musical quality of the score. Students will conduct selected musical works throughout the semester chosen and assigned by the instructor to emphasize the development of basic skills, including proper stance, definitive preparatory beats and releases, use of the left hand, indications of the dynamics, expressive gestures, facial expression, use of the baton, subdivision of beats, and dynamic application of musical terminologies.

Special Topics in Music: Music in Film (Cr.3)
50:700:493:Sec.D1:05225 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Polack, Eric
Email: epolack@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. The course will examine the close relationship that music and the cinema have had since the days of silent film. Topics will include important figures in the film music industry and their contributions, as well as how music affects the audience's response to onscreen images.

Special Topics in Music: Music of Club 27 (Cr.3)
50:700:497:Sec.D1:05226 eCollege
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Lally, Laurie
Email: llally@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. There are at least 45 musicians, (from Robert Johnson, Janis Joplin, Hendrix, to more recently, Amy Winehouse) who have died at the age of 27. This course will examine the lives of many of these performers, their musical contributions, and the eerie similarities and circumstances surrounding their deaths. Listening examples will be provided as well as a requirement for independent web research. The course is offered in eCollege and will be available to students opening day of class. General course information, such as required text(s), can be found beforehand at sakai.rutgers.edu

Special Topics in Music: Instrumentation in Music (Cr.3)
50:700:498:Sec.A1:05227 eCollege
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Lally, Laurie
Email: llally@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. Satisfies the Fine Arts General Requirement. This course would examine the choice and usage of instruments for various genres beginning with the American Symphony to today's popular styles. Topics covered would be: 1) Instrument description and function with listening examples; 2) Comparative listening between genres; 3) Choice of instrumentation as a means of expression (this includes dynamics, tempo, accents and other orchestral components); 4) Various artists within each genre examined that have mastered an instrument (ex. Genre: Rock; Instrument: Percussion; Group: The Who; Artist: Keith Moon) Videos would be provided as examples. The course is offered in eCollege and will be available to students opening day of class. General course information, such as required text(s), can be found beforehand at sakai.rutgers.edu

Independent Study in Music (Cr.BA)
50:700:499:Sec.T1:01114
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent study, guided by a member of the faculty, intended to provide an opportunity to investigate areas not covered in regular courses of instruction.

Back to List.


APPLIED MUSIC

Piano I (Cr.1)
50:701:161:Sec.T1:00328
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Piano II (Cr.1)
50:701:162:Sec.T1:00329
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Voice I (Cr.1)
50:701:169:Sec.T1:00330
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Voice II (Cr.1)
50:701:170:Sec.T1:00331
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Guitar I (Cr.1)
50:701:175:Sec.T1:00332
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Guitar II (Cr.1)
50:701:176:Sec.T1:01494
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Piano III (Cr.1)
50:701:261:Sec.T1:01492
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Piano IV (Cr.1)
50:701:262:Sec.T1:01493
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Voice III (Cr.1)
50:701:269:Sec.T1:03236
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Voice IV (Cr.1)
50:701:270:Sec.T1:02403
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
Additional fee of $40 per lesson. Private instruction.

Back to List.


SPEECH

Public Speaking (Cr.3)
50:950:281:Sec.A6:05263 FA 219
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Davenport, Clara
Email: ckantner@camden.rutgers.edu
Principles of public speaking. Practice in preparation, composition, and delivery of various types of speeches.

Back to List.


THEATER ARTS

Introduction to Theater (G) (Cr.3)
50:965:101:Sec.A1:05266 Sakai
5/23-6/20 Time by arrangement
Moorhead, Daniel
Email: daniel.moorhead@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. An introduction to the collaborative process of creating theater by examining the roles of the producer, playwright, director, actor, and designer, and how aesthetic choices are made based on analysis and interpretation of play texts.

Introduction to Theater (G) (Cr.3)
50:965:101:Sec.D1:05266 FA 217
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Turco, Frank
Email: francis.turco@rutgers.edu
Satisfies the Global General Requirement. An introduction to the collaborative process of creating theater by examining the roles of the producer, playwright, director, actor, and designer, and how aesthetic choices are made based on analysis and interpretation of play texts.

Modern Drama (Cr.3)
50:965:381:Sec.D1:05330 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Moorhead, Daniel
Email: daniel.moorhead@rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. A survey from the 18th century to the present, with emphasis on the major periods, typical plays, performance theories, important personages, and major playhouses and forms of production.  Western and non-Western traditions will be examined.

Independent Study in Theater (Cr.BA)
50:965:359:Sec.T1:03233
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: elliott1@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor.

Back to List.


FOREIGN LANGUAGES
includes FRENCH, GERMAN, ITALIAN, LATIN, SPANISH

FRENCH

Elementary French I (Cr.4)
50:420:101:Sec.A1:00282 ATG 219
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Ellman, Norman
Email: nellman@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of French or with no more than two years of high school French. Entering students with previous French study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Stu Lays a foundation for speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the language.

Elementary French II (Cr.4)
50:420:102:Sec.D1:00827 ATG 219
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Ellman, Norman
Email: nellman@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:420:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of French or with no more than three years of high school French. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with more than Continuation of 50:420:101.

Back to List.


GERMAN

Elementary German I (Cr.4)
50:470:101:Sec.A1:05202 ATG 218
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Staff
Email: rushing@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of German or with usually no more than two years of high school German. Entering students with previous German study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency Training in pronunciation, grammar, composition, conversation, and in the reading of simple texts.

Elementary German II (Cr.4)
50:470:102:Sec.D1:05203 ATG 218
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Staff
Email: rushing@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:470:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance is required. For students with little knowledge of German or with usually no more than three years of high school German. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students wit Continuation of 50:470:101.

Back to List.


ITALIAN

Elementary Italian I (Cr.4)
50:560:101:Sec.A1:01097 ATG 108
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
DiSanzo, Christine
Email: quidnovi2@msn.com
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Italian or with no more than two years of high school Italian. Training lays a foundation for speaking, writing, understanding, and reading the language.

Elementary Italian II (Cr.4)
50:560:102:Sec.D1:01098 ATG 108
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
DiSanzo, Christine
Email: quidnovi2@msn.com
Pre-requisite: 50:560:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. Further practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Italian. A review of grammar and study of significant texts.

Back to List.


LATIN

Elementary Latin I (Cr.3)
50:580:101:Sec.A1:05215 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Budin, Stephanie
Email: sbudin@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course fee of $100. For students with no knowledge of Latin or with no more than two years of high school Latin. Students with three or more years of Latin in high school may not take 101 for credit. Beginning course in Latin language: grammar, vocabulary, and syntax.

Elementary Latin II (Cr.3)
50:580:102:Sec.D1:05216 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Budin, Stephanie
Email: sbudin@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:580:101 or equivalent. Online course fee or $100. For students with little knowledge of Latin or with no more than three years of high school Latin. Students with more than three years of Latin in high school may not take 102 for credit. Note that 102 is the minimum level for A continuation of Latin I.

Back to List.


SPANISH

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.A1:01446 ATG 212
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Molano, Charles
Email: cmolano@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. S Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.A2:01584 ATG 109
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Downing, Judith
Email: judithd@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. S Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.A6:00295 ATG 212
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Staff
Email: rushing@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. S Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.B6:02651 JBMDL
5/19-7/2 M,W 5:30pm-10:00pm
Carl, William
Email: wcarl@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Off campus course at JBMDL. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exa Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.D2:02278 FA 217
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Raden, Matt
Email: mraden2002@yahoo.com
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. S Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.D1:05261 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Pilla, Dana
Email: dana@danapilla.com
Online course fee of $100. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with three o Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish I (Cr.4)
50:940:101:Sec.J1:03237 ATG 212
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Molano, Charles
Email: cmolano@camden.rutgers.edu
Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with no knowledge of Spanish or with no more than two years of high school Spanish. Entering students with previous Spanish study will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. S Training designed to lay a foundation for speaking, writing, reading, and understanding the language.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.A6:05262 ATG 108
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Laguna, Ana
Email: alaguna@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or Continuation of 50:940:101.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.D1:01447 ATG 212
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Molano, Charles
Email: cmolano@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or Continuation of 50:940:101.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.D2:00296 ATG 109
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Raden, Matt
Email: mraden2002@yahoo.com
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or Continuation of 50:940:101.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.D6:01585 ATG 212
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Staff
Email: rushing@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or Continuation of 50:940:101.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.H6:02652 JBMDL
7/8-8/21 Tu,Th 5:30pm-10:00pm
Carl, William
Email: wcarl@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Off campus course at JBMDL. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four Continuation of 50:940:101.

Elementary Spanish II (Cr.4)
50:940:102:Sec.J2:02007 ATG 109
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Raden, Matt
Email: mraden2002@yahoo.com
Pre-requisite: 50:940:101 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. For students with little knowledge of Spanish or with no more than three years of high school Spanish. Entering students will be placed according to the results of a proficiency exam. Students with four or Continuation of 50:940:101.

Intermediate Spanish I (G) (Cr.4)
50:940:121:Sec.A1:03238 ATG 208
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 9:00am-12:30pm
Santos, Lorena
Email: lsantosq@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:940:102 or equivalent. Note special schedule. Lab attendance required. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. Oral and written practice, emphasizing grammar review, and reading of selected materials.

Independent Study in Spanish (Cr.BA)
50:940:353:Sec.H6:03691 JBMDL
7/1-8/13 Time by arrangement
Carl, William
Email: wcarl@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Guided independent reading and writing on a specific topic for advanced intermediate-level students under exceptional conditions

Independent Study in Spanish (Cr.BA)
50:940:353:Sec.J1:00862
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: rushing@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Guided independent reading and writing on a specific topic for advanced intermediate-level students under exceptional conditions

Internship in Spanish I (Cr.3)
50:940:399:Sec.K1:01408
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Open to matriculated students in the College of Arts and Sciences (School 50) from all academic departments. Students will receive a letter grade.

Back to List.


HISTORY

Internship in Public History (Cr.3)
50:509:474:Sec.K1:02273
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Available to students from any academic department; this course requires a minimum of 100 hours in the field (fall and spring); 150 hours (summer), along with additional classroom time on various professional development topics. Students must secure the internship and have it approved by the internship coordinator prior to registering for this course. Academic major credit is available based on approval from several departments.

World War II (G) (Cr.3)
50:510:336:Sec.D3:05204 ATG 105
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Barton, Nimish
Email: nbarton@princeton.edu
Open to majors and non-majors. Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy or Global General Requirement. The Second World War was a crucial event in 20th-century world history that affected the fates of states and peoples throughout the globe. This 4-week long summer course will explore the causes, course and legacies of the Second World War with particular attention to Europe, the United States and Japan. We will examine how the war arose out of a fundamental conflict between the political forces of fascism, communism and liberal democracy as well as the imperial and racial ideologies of Germany and Japan. We will also examine various patterns and methods of occupation, collaboration, and resistance during World War II in Europe and Asia. We will discuss the Holocaust of European Jewry and technologies of terror employed by Soviets, Nazis and Japanese aggressors from the 1930s until the end of the conflict. Finally, we will consider the legacies of the Second World War in the postwar period: who were remembered as victims, victors and villains? What historical events were willfully “forgotten" in order to carry on after the war? Through a study of WWII, then, we will consider wider issues related to the politics of memory and the ethics of history.

Special Topics in European History: 19th Century European Diplomatic History (G) (Cr.3)
50:510:380:Sec.D2:05205 FA 242
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Golding, Christopher
Email: cgolding@gmail.com
Open to majors and non-majors. Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy or Global General Requirement. This course will be a survey of the history of European diplomacy from the wars of the French Revolution until the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Modern warfare, nationalism, and tremendous economic, social, and technological upheaval shaped the 19th Century and fundamentally altered the way nation-states interacted. Therefore, we cannot be content in this course to study the biographies of Metternich, Napoleon III, Bismarck, and other great diplomats of the 19th Century, though they will receive due attention. In order to explain the events that in many ways laid the groundwork for the world situation in our own time, we will examine cultural and intellectual movements, military and scientific innovations, and political and social changes that still affect the way nations conduct diplomacy.

AMERICAN HISTORY

Sports in American History (Cr.3)
50:512:276:Sec.A3:05206 ATG 106
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
D'Ignazio, Catherine
Email: dignazio@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. Traces the role of sport in the development of American history from colonial roots through modern urban-industrial society.

America in the Age of World Wars (Cr.3)
50:512:330:Sec.J3:05207 ATG 105
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Seitter, John
Email: john.seitter@rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. World War I, the decades of the 1920s and 1930s, the evolution of economic policy during the Hoover and Roosevelt presidencies, and the events of World War II.

Special Topics in American History: Cold War Culture (Cr.3)
50:512:380:Sec.A1:05208 ATG 205
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Demirjian, Richard
Email: rdemirj@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. In this seminar-style course, we will focus on the United States between 1941 and 1991. The Cold War, an era characterized by the superpower standoff between the United States and the former Soviet Union, provides a fruitful subject for cultural analysis. The focus of our exploration of this era will be the social and cultural changes wrought by atomic weapons and the threat of Communist expansion both abroad and at home. Such phenomena as television, suburbia, science fiction, rock and roll, the Civil Rights movement and the counter-culture are just a few of the trends and processes that emerged during these years. There will be no exams in this course. Students will be evaluated upon two criteria: 1) a series of short reaction papers and book reviews addressing essays and novels from, or about, the period and 2) class performance/participation. We will also have a lot of fun examining and discussing films, television programs, and commercial ads from the period which serve as rich primary source documents of how Americans processed the changing and threatening world around them.

Special Topics in American History: US History Through American Law (Cr.3)
50:512:381:Sec.A2:05209 BSB 109
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Campbell, Daniel
Email: campbell08234@gmail.com
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. This course is a critical study of U.S. history by an examination of the development of American constitutional law through a review of cases and legislation. This development will be placed in the larger context of contemporaneous events in American history. Focus will be on cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, federal constitutional amendments and laws.

Special Topics in American History: Civil War in American Memory (Cr.3)
50:512:382:Sec.D1:05211 ATG 205
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Demirjian, Richard
Email: rdemirj@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. In this seminar-style course we will consider the ongoing memory of the American Civil War. Over 150 since its eruption, this seminal national moment continues to stand as the crossroads of our history. The sacrifice, suffering, and glory engendered by this fratricidal conflict capture the imagination of millions as evidenced by the millions of visitors to national parks, the innumerable published works, and legions of historical re-enactors which keep its memory alive. The Civil War defined and re-defined questions of federal and state authority, slavery and freedom, the fate of western lands, medical science, and even taxation. Yet in spite of all the change it wrought, there are those today who would suggest that it is still, in some ways, being fought. This course will examine the ways that Americans have searched for meaning in their Civil War, and how they have remembered it even re-fought its underlying battles in their culture. There will be no exams in this course. Students will be evaluated upon two criteria: 1) a series of short papers addressing a host of assigned readings and films and 2) informed class participation.

Special Topics in American History: Native American History (Cr.3)
50:512:383:Sec.H1:05212 Sakai
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
D'Argenio, Joseph
Email: jdargeni@gccnj.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. A survey of Native American history in North America from the Paleolithic Era to the present, focusing on the social, cultural, economic, and political foundations of a variety of native communities. Special thematic emphasis is placed on interaction across cultures, resistance and adaptation to the European and African presences following the late-fifteenth century, and cultural survival and rejuvenation during the twentieth century and beyond.

Special Topics in American History: Developing a Curatorial Eye and Style (Cr.BA)
50:512:391:Sec.J2:05210 FA 217
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Gonzalez, Maria E.
Email: eb9414@gmail.com
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy General Requirement. Curators, catalogers and book sellers examine, research and describe a variety of artifacts in ways to unlock their secrets and make them more alluring to the public. The process of analyzing and contextualizing all sorts of artifacts to determine their historical significance can be learned and systematically applied. This class will provide students basic curatorial and cataloging tools for describing existing archival materials and determining the potential enduring value of common everyday items.

Independent Study in American History (Cr.BA)
50:512:499:Sec.A1:00948
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: lbernste@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent reading under the direction of a member of the department.

Independent Study in American History (Cr.BA)
50:512:499:Sec.B1:00944
5/27-7/3 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: lbernste@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent reading under the direction of a member of the department.

Independent Study in American History (Cr.BA)
50:512:499:Sec.D1:00945
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: lbernste@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent reading under the direction of a member of the department.

Independent Study in American History (Cr.BA)
50:512:499:Sec.H1:00952
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: lbernste@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent reading under the direction of a member of the department.

WORLD HISTORY

Special Topics in World History: Cultures, Cities and Colonies in Africa since 1850 (G) (Cr.3)
50:516:380:Sec.B2:05213 FA 108
5/27-7/3 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-12:40pm
Adelusi-Adeluyi, Ademide
Email: aaa350@nyu.edu
Satisfies the History/Religion/Philosophy or Global General Requirement. This course examines the history of Africa since 1850, focusing on a number of interconnected themes including colonialism, ethnic identities, the end of the transatlantic slave trade, anti-colonial movements, and the processes of decolonization that transformed the continent in the (54 and counting) nation-states that we see today. We will not study Africa as an isolated space, but will instead explore political, cultural and economic relationships bridging locales, regions and other continents, as a way of understanding Africa’s complex and diverse histories. Studying Africa’s history since 1850 will also provide context for understanding the contemporary issues – such as rapid urbanization, health crises and political instability – that keep various African various African countries in the news today. This course will use a range of multimedia sources – film, texts, maps, and audio – in addition to taking advantage of local resources (museums, exhibitions and online projects).

Back to List.


INSTITUTE FOR EFFECTIVE EDUCATION

Fundamentals of the Teaching Profession (Cr.3)
50:964:101:Sec.A1:05264 eCollege
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Heidelberg, Ann
Email: aheidel@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. This course will include broad introductory coverage of teaching as a profession, family and community partnerships, lesson planning, technology, educational philosophies, and certification in New Jersey.

Exceptional Learners (Cr.3)
50:964:201:Sec.A1:02152 eCollege
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Devito, Joyce
Email: joycede@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. A survey of the neurological, sensory, orthopedic, communicative, and social disabilities present in children and the impact of these on the psychological and academic development of the child. Students will also examine the impact of the disabilities on cognitive, mental, and social growth and the factors to be considered in assessment and rehabilitative developments.

Developmental Literacy (Cr.3)
50:964:309:Sec.A3:05265 ATG 205
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Fennick, Ellen
Email: efennick@gmail.com
An analysis of the development of language arts skills in both typical and atypical development. Students will examine current reading and communication strategies as they relate to the various academic disciplines in education, including the social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and mathematics.

Special Education Assessment and Measurement (Cr.3)
50:964:342:Sec.J3:03239 ATG 208
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Tighe, John
Email: johnjtighe@gmail.com
An overview of the knowledge, skills, and understanding of assessment issues related to students in both general and special education settings. The types and characteristics of assessments, both formal and informal assessment in special education, and the use of assessment information to determine eligibility and courses of action will be addressed. In addition, setting instructional goals, monitoring progress, and determining the effectiveness of instruction will be covered.

Behavior Management (Cr.3)
50:964:343:Sec.D3:01903 ATG 207
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Park, Debra
Email: debpark@camden.rutgers.edu
An examination of behavioral and psychotherapies for the range of behavior disorders commonly found in the classroom. The course will equip students with a variety of research-based strategies and models of discipline to address behavior management in a classroom

Special Education Materials and Methods (Cr.3)
50:964:344:Sec.A6:01904 ATG 222
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 5:30pm-9:10pm
Mislan, Cathie
Email: camislan@camden.rutgers.edu
A survey of the research-based instructional strategies and materials necessary for a classroom of diverse learners. Students will learn to develop education plans for students, including IEPs, and they will plan both short- and long-term units of instruction for a variety of instructional settings. Students will also gain practice in assessing students' needs and using this information as a basis for choosing materials and content, planning, and presenting such information.

Special Education Practicum (Cr.3)
50:964:445:Sec.E3:03241 ATG 221
6/23-7/31 Tu,Th 4:30pm-5:50pm
Clendening, Donna
Email: donnacl@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Admitted Institute for Effective Education Program students only; completion of appropriate field experience application(s). Additional field-work. Note special schedule. Field placement done through department. In-class meetings on 6/23, 7/1, 7/8, 7/10, 7/15, 7/17, and 7/22. In the fieldwork component, students are assigned to work in a special education setting under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. The student will thus gain an understanding of instructional planning, teaching strategies, educational technology, classroom management, and how NJCCCS are implemented in a special education classroom. The fieldwork will include the teaching of at least two lessons. In the seminar component, students will have the opportunity to discuss and evaluate with their peers the classroom interaction that they have observed, as well as the interrelationships of teaching/learning theory and practice.

Practicum II (Cr.3)
50:964:456:Sec.O1:02645 ATG 101
5/12-5/30 M,Tu,W,Th 4:30pm-5:50pm
Heidelberg, Ann
Email: aheidel@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Acceptance of student teaching application; this course may only be taken in one of the two semesters immediately prior to student teaching. Additional field-work. Note special schedule. Field placement done through department. Field work days 5/12-5/30. In-class meetings on 5/9, 5/14, 5/15, 5/19, 5/20, and 5/21. In the fieldwork component of this second Practicum, students are again assigned to work in a school setting under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. This experience will provide the student with the opportunity to become more familiar with the role of the teacher and the dynamics of the classroom and will include the teaching of lessons. The student will thus gain a more in-depth understanding of instructional planning, teaching strategies, educational technology, classroom management, and how standards are implemented in the classroom. In the seminar component, students will again have the opportunity to discuss and evaluate with their peers the classroom interaction that they have observed, as well as the interrelationships of teaching/learning theory and practice.

Practicum II (Cr.3)
50:964:456:Sec.O2:02646 ATG 105
5/12-5/30 M,Tu,W,Th 4:30pm-5:50pm
Rothwell, John
Email: rothwell_john@hotmail.com
Pre-requisite: Acceptance of student teaching application; this course may only be taken in one of the two semesters immediately prior to student teaching. Additional field-work. Note special schedule. Field placement done through department. Field work days 5/12-5/30. In-class meetings on 5/9, 5/14, 5/15, 5/19, 5/20, and 5/21. In the fieldwork component of this second Practicum, students are again assigned to work in a school setting under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. This experience will provide the student with the opportunity to become more familiar with the role of the teacher and the dynamics of the classroom and will include the teaching of lessons. The student will thus gain a more in-depth understanding of instructional planning, teaching strategies, educational technology, classroom management, and how standards are implemented in the classroom. In the seminar component, students will again have the opportunity to discuss and evaluate with their peers the classroom interaction that they have observed, as well as the interrelationships of teaching/learning theory and practice.

Back to List.


MATHEMATICS

Elementary Algebra (Cr.N3)
50:640:041:Sec.A2:03059 ATG 106
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Gandhi, Tejas
Email: tejasg@camden.rutgers.edu
For students who do not have the usual background in mathematics for college admission. This course does not grant college credit. The system of integers, exponentiation, graphing, solution of equations, and basic notions of geometry.

Elementary Algebra (Cr.N3)
50:640:041:Sec.D2:03060 ATG 108(105)
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Cheng, Kitty
Email: kittytongcheng@gmail.com
For students who do not have the usual background in mathematics for college admission. This course does not grant college credit. The system of integers, exponentiation, graphing, solution of equations, and basic notions of geometry.

Intermediate Algebra (Cr.N3)
50:640:042:Sec.A2:02680 ATG 113
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Staff
Email: gtoth@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:041 or placement by basic skills test. This course does not grant college credit. Study of algebraic operations on polynomials, integral and rational exponents, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, and the function concept.

Intermediate Algebra (Cr.N3)
50:640:042:Sec.D2:03061 ATG 113
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Johansen, Josephine
Email: jjohanse@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:041 or placement by basic skills test. This course does not grant college credit. Study of algebraic operations on polynomials, integral and rational exponents, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, and the function concept.

Fundamental Math Systems I (Cr.3)
50:640:103:Sec.D2:00355 ATG 221
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Mershon, Randy
Email: rmershon@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on mathematics placement examination. Particularly suitable for students of elementary education. Sets, logic, number systems, algebraic structures, and the concept of functions and inverses.

Fundamental Math Systems II (Cr.3)
50:640:104:Sec.J2:00356 ATG 113
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Johansen, Josephine
Email: jjohanse@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on mathematics placement examination. Particularly suitable for students of elementary education. Informal geometry, measurement in 2-D and 3-D, coordinate geometry, transformational geometry, similarity vs. congruence, and functions.

Introduction to Math Thought (Cr.3)
50:640:106:Sec.J6:00283 ATG 219
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Birnbaum, Edite
Email: edeetb13@gmail.com
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on mathematics placement examination. For the student who has serious interest in learning something about mathematical thought and its applications, but who is not planning to major in mathematics. The topics covered are: set and number theory, the concept of functions and inverses, logic and reasoning, validity of arguments, inductive vs. deductive reasoning, group concepts, coordinate and transformational geometry in 2-D/3-D, the concept of measurement, and networks.

Numbers and Beyond (Cr.3)
50:640:108:Sec.A2:03073 ATG 206
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Mershon, Randy
Email: rmershon@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. This course is designed for students who are considering secondary certification. In addition, it also satisfies the 3-credit mathematics requirement for any other major. Study of the properties and qualities of number systems and spatial relationships in geometry. Topics needed to explore the developmental beauty of mathematics discussed. Some are logic and reasoning; set theory and number theory; function (not limited to linear); sequences; basic concepts from calculus; group and field concepts; and spatial concepts such as rotations, translations, and geometric objects.

Precalculus for Business, Economics and Life Sciences (Cr.3)
50:640:113:Sec.A6:05217 ATG 101
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Singh, Varun
Email: varun@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. A nonrequired preparatory course for those students who must take 50:640:130. A study of real numbers with regard to algebraic operations and order properties. Introduction to complex numbers and logarithmic and exponential functions.

Precalculus for Business, Economics and Life Sciences (Cr.3)
50:640:113:Sec.D2:02617 ATG 201
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Vijayarajan, Shobha
Email: shobha.vijayarajan@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. A nonrequired preparatory course for those students who must take 50:640:130. A study of real numbers with regard to algebraic operations and order properties. Introduction to complex numbers and logarithmic and exponential functions.

Precalculus College Math (Cr.3)
50:640:115:Sec.A2:05218 ATG 222
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Buthusiem, Gregory
Email: gregory.buthusiem@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Credit not given for both this course and 50:640:113. A nonrequired preparatory course for those students who must take 50:640:121-122. Algebraic expressions; algebraic equations; functions; graphing; and exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

Precalculus College Math (Cr.3)
50:640:115:Sec.J2:00750 ATG 219
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Price, Clifford
Email: clifford.price@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:042 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Credit not given for both this course and 50:640:113. A nonrequired preparatory course for those students who must take 50:640:121-122. Algebraic expressions; algebraic equations; functions; graphing; and exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

Unified Calculus I (Cr.4)
50:640:121:Sec.D2:00284 BSB 107
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Mahmood, Sirag
Email: sirag.mahmood@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:115 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Note special schedule. Students who plan to take more than one semester of calculus should follow the sequence 50:640:121-122. Credit will not, in general, be given for more than one of the courses 50:640:116, 121, or 130. An introduction to analytic geometry, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of differentiation, and a brief introduction to integration.

Unified Calculus II (Cr.4)
50:640:122:Sec.A2:00285 ATG 201
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Nerurkar, Mahesh
Email: nmahesh@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:121 or equivalent. Note special schedule. An extensive introduction to integration and the definite integral, transcendental functions, methods of integration, applications, and infinite series.

Unified Calculus II (Cr.4)
50:640:122:Sec.J2:00286 ATG 106
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Nerurkar, Mahesh
Email: nmahesh@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:121 or equivalent. Note special schedule. An extensive introduction to integration and the definite integral, transcendental functions, methods of integration, applications, and infinite series.

Calculus for Business, Economics and Life Sciences (Cr.3)
50:640:130:Sec.A2:00287 ATG 101
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Ma, Dongyuan
Email: dongyuan@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:113 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Students who plan to take more than one semester of calculus should follow the sequence 50:640:121-122. Credit will not, in general, be given for more than one of the courses 50:640:116, 121, or 130. A one-semester survey of the elements of calculus with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and life sciences. Topics covered are basic algebra, derivatives, maximum/minimum problems, integration, and partial differentiation.

Calculus for Business, Economics and Life Sciences (Cr.3)
50:640:130:Sec.D2:01443 ATG 220
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
More, Paul
Email: paulmore@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:113 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Students who plan to take more than one semester of calculus should follow the sequence 50:640:121-122. Credit will not, in general, be given for more than one of the courses 50:640:116, 121, or 130. A one-semester survey of the elements of calculus with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and life sciences. Topics covered are basic algebra, derivatives, maximum/minimum problems, integration, and partial differentiation.

Calculus for Business, Economics and Life Sciences (Cr.3)
50:640:130:Sec.J6:00288 ATG 105
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Yoo, Yun
Email: yun.yoo.12@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:113 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement examination. Students who plan to take more than one semester of calculus should follow the sequence 50:640:121-122. Credit will not, in general, be given for more than one of the courses 50:640:116, 121, or 130. A one-semester survey of the elements of calculus with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and life sciences. Topics covered are basic algebra, derivatives, maximum/minimum problems, integration, and partial differentiation.

Unified Calculus III (Cr.4)
50:640:221:Sec.A2:00289 ATG 220
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-2:20pm
Lee, Will Yi
Email: wylee@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:122. Note special schedule. Solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and applications.

Elementary Differential Equations (Cr.3)
50:640:314:Sec.D6:02618 ATG 109
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Lang, Norman
Email: normanl@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisites: 50:640:221 and 250, or permission of instructor. Theory of ordinary differential equations. Power series methods and existence and uniqueness theorems. Applications to problems in economics, biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering.

Visualizing Mathematics by Computer (Cr.3)
50:640:347:Sec.H7:00992 FA 242
7/7-8/13 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm
Toth, Gabor
Email: gtoth@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisites: 50:640:121, 122, 221, or permission of instructor. A comprehensive introduction to symbolic computational packages and scientific visualization through examples from calculus and geometry. Covers two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and animated computer graphics using Maple, Mathematica, and Geomview. No programming knowledge required.

Individual Study in Mathematics (Cr.BA)
50:640:493:Sec.B1:00854
5/27-7/3 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: gtoth@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor.

Individual Study in Mathematics (Cr.BA)
50:640:494:Sec.H1:01052
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: gtoth@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor.

Back to List.


PHILOSOPHY

Introduction to Philosophy (Cr.3)
50:730:111:Sec.B1:03279 eCollege
5/27-7/3 Time by arrangement
Young, Ed
Email: profyoung@verizon.net
Online support fee of $100. Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. An introduction to philosophy with a special focus on particular philosophical issues in, for example, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, or other areas of philosophy. Course content varies from year to year.

Biomedical Ethics (Cr.3)
50:730:349:Sec.A1:05228 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Yates, Melissa
Email: yatesm@camden.rutgers.edu
Online support fee of $100. Credit not given for this course and 50:840:349. Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. An examination of ethical theories and their application to such issues as abortion, cloning, physician-patient relations, genetic manipulation, and health care justice.

Advanced Topics in Philosophy: Philosophy and Literature (Cr.3)
50:730:390:Sec.H1:05229 eCollege
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
Roth, Allison
Email: allison.roth@rutgers.edu
Online support fee of $100. Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. By analyzing significant works of literature, such as The Stranger, Hamlet, and Ayn Rand's Anthem, students will identify key philosophical ideas from metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and politics dramatized in the pieces.  These ideas include living in a world without God (Existentialism), how to acquire knowledge and act upon it, and whether we live primarily as individuals or members of a group (and the ethical and political consequences of that conclusion).  To assist in this analysis and prepare themselves to evaluate these ideas, students will read literary criticisms and philosophical works by Plato, Sartre, and others.

Advanced Topics in Philosophy: Philosophies of Human Existence (Cr.3)
50:730:391:Sec.H7:05230 JBMDL+Sakai
7/9-8/20 W 6:00pm-8:40pm and Hybrid
Levy, Lior
Email: liorlevy@temple.edu
Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. This course investigates several aspects of human existence in attempt to define and understand the meaning of being human. In pursuing this goal, we will read and analyze seminal texts that examine questions examine questions about what humans are and what constitutes personhood and identity, as well as more specific questions about human freedom, mind and body, the relationship between knowledge and self-knowledge, and morality.

Back to List.


PHYSICS

Elements of Physics I (Cr.3)
50:750:131:Sec.D1:01901 BSB 107
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Jimenez, Richard
Email: richjime@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre/Co-requisite: 50:640:121. Co-requisite: 50:750:133. Intended for physics majors and engineering students, but open to other qualified students. A calculus-based introduction to classical physics: mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, and light.

Elements of Physics II (Cr.3)
50:750:132:Sec.J1:01902 BSB 107
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Jimenez, Richard
Email: richjime@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre/Co-requisite: 50:640:122. Co-requisite: 50:750:134. Intended for physics majors and engineering students, but open to other qualified students. Continuation of Elements of Physics I. A calculus-based introduction to classical physics: mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, and light.

Introduction to Physics Lab I (Cr.1)
50:750:133:Sec.D1:00292 BSB 420
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Tomko, John
Email: john.tomko@rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:750:131 or 50:750:203. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:131 or 50:750:203.

Introduction to Physics Lab I (Cr.1)
50:750:133:Sec.D2:02713 BSB 420
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Naddeo, Joseph
Email: jnaddeo@gmail.com
Co-requisite: 50:750:131 or 50:750:203. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:131 or 50:750:203.

Introduction to Physics Lab I (Cr.1)
50:750:133:Sec.D3:00333 BSB 420
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Mershon, Randy
Email: rmershon@camden.rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:750:131 or 50:750:203. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:131 or 50:750:203.

Introduction to Physics Lab II (Cr.1)
50:750:134:Sec.J1:00293 BSB 420
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Tomko, John
Email: john.tomko@rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:750:132 or 50:750:204. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:132 or 50:750:204.

Introduction to Physics Lab II (Cr.1)
50:750:134:Sec.J2:02714 BSB 420
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Naddeo, Joseph
Email: jnaddeo@gmail.com
Co-requisite: 50:750:132 or 50:750:204. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:132 or 50:750:204.

Introduction to Physics Lab II (Cr.1)
50:750:134:Sec.J3:00359 BSB 420
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Mershon, Randy
Email: rmershon@camden.rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:750:132 or 50:750:204. Laboratory fee of $25. The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:132 or 50:750:204.

General Physics I (Cr.3)
50:750:203:Sec.D2:00290 BSB 132
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Bubb, Daniel
Email: danny.bubb@rutgers.edu
Co-requisite: 50:750:133. For biology, chemistry, premedicine, predentistry, and preveterinary medicine students, but may be taken by others. An introduction to mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism, and selected topics from modern physics.

General Physics II (Cr.3)
50:750:204:Sec.J2:00291 BSB 132
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Bubb, Daniel
Email: danny.bubb@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:750:203. Co-requisite: 50:750:134. For biology, chemistry, premedicine, predentistry, and preveterinary medicine students, but may be taken by others. A continuation of General Physics I. An introduction to mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism, and selected topics from modern physics.

Energy and the Environment (Cr.3)
50:750:374:Sec.D1:02321 Sakai
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Gambs, Gerald
Email: gcgambs@gmail.com
Online course support fee of $100. Satisfied the Natural Science General Requirement for non-science majors. Introduction (without laboratory) to energy and environmental principles. Covers basic concepts involved in understanding electricity conservation, efficiency, energy production, mineral resources, recycling, reuse, fossil fuel resources, utility generating effects, weather, climate change, nuclear reactions, nuclear safety, renewable solar, water, and biomass.

Independent Study in Physics (Cr.BA)
50:750:489:Sec.D1:03605
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: danny.bubb@rutgers.edu

Back to List.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

Introduction to American Politics(Cr.3)
50:790:215:Sec.H6:05443 ATG 208
7/7-8/13 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Knievel, Tim
Email: tim.knievel@rutgers.edu
A comprehensive survey of American national government; its institutions, functions, and processes, including constitutionalism, federalism, elections, pressure politics, social and economic policies, and national security.

Geography and the World (D)(G) (Cr.3)
50:790:284:Sec.J6:05231 ATG 109
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Ojea, Patricia
Email: ojea@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the Global or Diversity General Requirement. Examines how political and social developments have transformed natural environments and how natural environments influence political and social phenomena.

Government and Politics of the Middle East (G) (Cr.3)
50:790:336:Sec.A2:05232 ACCC+Sakai
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm and hybrid.
Ayubi, Shaheen
Email: sayubi@camden.rutgers.edu
Off campus course at Atlantic Cape Community College. Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. An introduction to the government and politics of Israel, the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran, and certain other marginal lands. Consideration of contemporary crises and tensions and the role of nationalism, world history, World War II, ideological competition, and power politics in the area.

Government and Politics of the Middle East (G) (Cr.3)
50:790:336:Sec.H6:05233 JBMDL+eCollege
7/9-8/20 W 6:00pm-8:50pm and hybrid.
Massi, Ray
Email: raymassi@camden.rutgers.edu
Off campus course at JBMDL. Note special schedule. Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. An introduction to the government and politics of Israel, the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran, and certain other marginal lands. Consideration of contemporary crises and tensions and the role of nationalism, world history, World War II, ideological competition, and power politics in the area.

Urban Legal Problems (Cr.3)
50:790:346:Sec.A1:02969 Sakai
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Ojea, Patricia
Email: ojea@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course support fee of $100. Analyzes contemporary urban problems from a legal perspective, while recognizing that law is a product of political processes; explores legal problems including municipal powers, intergovernmental relations, zoning, urban renewal, legal aspects of tax reform, and law used as a vehicle of urban social change.

Internship in Political Science (Cr.BA)
50:790:397:Sec.K1:02737
5/27-8/5 Time by arrangement
Marino, James and Hallman, Cheryl
Email: jmarino@camden.rutgers.edu; challman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students work in a political or governmental capacity and meet regularly for faculty consultation and exploration of experiences and conclusions.

Women and Political Development (D) (Cr.3)
50:790:424:Sec.D6:05234 ATG 205
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Ojea, Patricia
Email: ojea@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the Diversity General Requirement. This course analyses the role of women in developing countries. Specifically is explores how women contribute to socio-economic development through political participation, micro-entetprise and socialization. Developing nations are compared in terms of their policies on the educational and economic status of women.

Civil Liberties in Times of Emergencies (Cr.3)
50:790:426:Sec.B6:05235 JBMDL+Sakai
5/22-7/3 Th 6:00pm-8:50pm+Hybrid
Shanahan, William
Email: william.shanahan@rutgers.edu
Off campus course at JBMDL. Note special schedule. Hybrid course with partial online component. This course examines the effect of war and other national emergencies on the protection of individual rights and the balance that should be struck between national security and individual liberties. Although the course focuses primarily on national emergencies throughout American history, it will also examine how other countries have sought to strike the balance between national security and liberty.

Civil Liberties in Times of Emergencies (Cr.3)
50:790:426:Sec.B7:05236 ACCC+Sakai
5/27-7/3 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm+Hybrid
Knievel, Tim
Email: tim.knievel@rutgers.edu
Off campus course at Atlantic Cape Community College. Hybrid course with partial online component. This course examines the effect of war and other national emergencies on the protection of individual rights and the balance that should be struck between national security and individual liberties. Although the course focuses primarily on national emergencies throughout American history, it will also examine how other countries have sought to strike the balance between national security and liberty.

Resource Scarcity and National Security (Cr.3)
50:790:427:Sec.B1:05347 WM
5/27-7/3 M,W 9:00am-12:40pm
Moschberger, Jonathan
Email: no email
Off campus course at Brookdale Community College. Natural resources are closely linked to economic prosperity and international security. The need to procure and protect vital resources, particularly oil and water, has had a profound impact on U.S. national security and foreign policy. The purpose of this course is to study three major aspects linking natural resources and national security: 1) U.S. energy security and energy policy, 2) types of violence associated with conflict over scarce resources, and 3) strategies for conflict resolution. The course concludes with a discussion of the future trajectory of resource disputes and the policy implications for national security.

Anti-Americanism (G) (Cr.3)
50:790:429:Sec.J2:05238 BSB 134+Sakai
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm+Hybrid
Ayubi, Shaheen
Email: sayubi@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. Anti-Americanism, a means of challenging American power and global leadership, and defined as a set of negative predispositions toward the United States, has been energized by the unipolar world following the collapse of Communism. This course will explore and examine three different (and even contradictory) forms of anti-Americanism: liberal anti-Americanism, which criticizes our support for dictatorships abroad; social anti-Americanism, which criticizes our lack of social welfare programs; and sovereign-nationalist anti-Americanism from nations wanting to preserve identities that may be at odds with the liberal democratic values America seeks to export.

Rich Nations, Poor Nations (G) (Cr.3)
50:790:469:Sec.D2:05240 BSB 134+Sakai
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm+Hybrid
Ayubi, Shaheen
Email: sayubi@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with partial online component. Satisfies the Global General Requirement. Comparative analysis of the foreign policies of developing areas dealing largely with economic, political, and historical determinants of foreign policy objectives within the context of domestic and world affairs. Emphasis on Asia, Saharan Africa, and/or Latin America.

Back to List.


PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to Psychology (Cr.3)
50:830:101:Sec.J1:05242 ATG 201
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Murzyn, Theresa
Email: tmurzyn@camden.rutgers.edu
Introduction to the methods, theories, facts, and basic principles in the major fields of psychology, including biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive processes, life span development, personality, social psychology, psychological testing, and clinical diagnosis and treatment. Participation in research or completion of an approved, appropriate alternative activity required.

Psychology of Personality (Cr.3)
50:830:231:Sec.D1:05243 ATG 201
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Markey, Patrick
Email: patrick.markey@villanova.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:101 or 50:830:135. Personality psychology examines how and why people differ from one another in terms of how he or she feels, thinks, and behaves. Various theories will be presented in order to explain the origins and consequences of such individual differences. Topics covered in the class have relevance to students everyday lives including, goals, romantic partners, gender differences, the unconscious mind, and personality traits.

Statistics for Social Sciences (Cr.3)
50:830:250:Sec.A3:02276 ATG 108
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Duffy, E. Sean
Email: seduffy@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:101 or 50:830:135. Credit not given for this course and 50:960:183 or equivalent. Introduction to basic concepts of statistics, both descriptive (organization and presentation of data) and inferential (drawing conclusions from data), with emphasis on practical applications in psychological research.

Research Methods (Cr.3)
50:830:256:Sec.D3:05244 BSB 134
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
August, Kristin
Email: kristin.august@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:101 or 50:830:135. Survey of research methods in psychology, emphasizing the guiding role of theory in scientific research. Consideration of the nature and history of scientific theories in psychology, hypothesis generation, review of extant literature, measurement, experimental design, control of extraneous variables, analysis, interpretation, replication, and testing the ecological validity of results. Emphasis on the self-correcting nature of the research process through replication and extension, peer review, increased methodological sophistication, and quantitative analysis.

Research Methods (Cr.3)
50:830:256:Sec.H1:05245 CCC
7/14-8/14 M,Tu,W,Th 8:30am-10:30am
Schulz, Jessica
Email: jessica.schulz@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:101 or 50:830:135. Note special schedule. Off-campus course offered at Camden County College. Survey of research methods in psychology, emphasizing the guiding role of theory in scientific research. Consideration of the nature and history of scientific theories in psychology, hypothesis generation, review of extant literature, measurement, experimental design, control of extraneous variables, analysis, interpretation, replication, and testing the ecological validity of results. Emphasis on the self-correcting nature of the research process through replication and extension, peer review, increased methodological sophistication, and quantitative analysis.

Industrial Psychology (Cr.3)
50:830:319:Sec.A2:03092 ATG 207
5/27-6/19 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Nave, Chris
Email: christopher.nave@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. Cross-listed with 56:830:619:A2. Personnel selection and placement; psychology of industrial and human relations; worker morale, motivation, and efficiency; human factors in equipment design, marketing, and advertising research.

Psychology of Adolescence (Cr.3)
50:830:326:Sec.J6:05246 ATG 201
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Meluso-Scafidi, Angela
Email: acmeluso@gmail.com
Pre-requisite: 50:830:101 or 50:830:135. A survey of development during the adolescent and early adult years. Contemporary theories and research will be used to help students understand issues central to adolescence including pubertal development; cognitive development; identity, dating, and sexuality; family and peer relationships; adolescents at school and work; culture and the media; and challenges faced by adolescents. Adolescence will be discussed both as a distinct stage of life and as an integral component of development across the life span.

Cognitive Processes (Cr.3)
50:830:362:Sec.A1:05247 ATG 201
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
van der Wel, Robrecht
Email: r.vanderwel@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. This course provides a whirlwind tour on one of the great mysteries of our existence, how the brain gives rise to our behaviors. The course covers how we perceive our environment, our ability to process incoming information, how we remember, how we reason and solve problems, how we understand and produce language, and how we plan our actions to accomplish goals in the world around us. The course provides students with knowledge of laboratory techniques for studying brain and cognition. It also provides an overview of some of the theoretical models of different cognitive functions. Finally, a good chunk of the course will focus on how knowledge of the brain and cognitive functions can be applied in education, nursing and rehabilitation, civil engineering, and the social sciences in general.

Special Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Parenting (Cr.3)
50:830:462:Sec.B1:05248 CCC
5/27-6/23 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:30am
Meier, Ines
Email: ines.meier@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. Note special schedule. Off-campus course offered at Camden County College. This course will explore psychological ideas and research relevant to parenting. Students will learn about different theories and applications in the field of parenting psychology and they will examine the roles of parents in the growth and development of their children. Psychological constructs such as learning, motivation, cognitive processes and social construction will serve as basis to understand contemporary educational practices. Students will have the opportunity to discuss current issues that impact parenting and they will examine different types of contemporary families.

Special Topics in Psychology: Cultural Psychology of Food (Cr.3)
50:830:463:Sec.D3:05249 ATG 201
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Duffy, E. Sean
Email: seduffy@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. It is often said that we are what we eat, but what we eat depends to a large extent upon the cultural matrix in which our lives are embedded. This multi-disciplinary course examines factors that shape how people produce and consume food. Topics to be discussed include ethnic identity and cultural cuisine, the development of taste and memory, the globalization of food and its implication on culinary diversity, evolutionary and developmental origins of disgust, delight, and other food-induced emotional associations, and other topics. We will also create and sample cuisines from different cultures to better understand the cultural variability in food preferences across the world.

Special Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Happiness (Cr.3)
50:830:464:Sec.J3:05250 ATG 201
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Park, Debra
Email: debpark@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. While there is no shortage of lay theories and self-help literature that offer advice on how to achieve "the good life," this course will examine the nature of happiness from the viewpoint of experimental social psychology. We will explore the history of "happiness" research from diverse perspectives as well as the most current scientific research on "well-being." You will be required to participate every day in class literature circles (discussions on readings) and apply what you learn in several written assignments. What makes life good for you, the individual, your society, and the world? Join us as we pursue these essential questions and how psychologists are applying the research to improve the quality of life for us all.

Pscyhological Analysis of Animal Behavior (Cr.3)
50:830:476:Sec.A2:05251 ATG 123
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Bravo, Mary
Email: mbravo@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:830:255. A male praying mantis will continue to mate even after the female mantis has eaten his head. Without a brain, how does the body keep mating? That’s a proximate question that can be answered by examining the nervous system of the mantis. Why does the male mantis continue to mate when he is effectively dead? And why does the female mantis eat her partner’s head? Those are ultimate questions that can be answered by understanding natural selection. In this course, we will try to understand a wide range of animal behaviors by examining both proximate and ultimate explanations. In many cases, the methods used by scientists studying these behaviors are as ingenious as the behaviors themselves, and so we will also examine the research behind these explanations of animal behavior. This class includes field trips to the NJ State Aquarium and the Philadelphia Zoo.

Individual Supervision of Field Work in Psychology (Cr.BA)
50:830:493:Sec.K1:05252 ATG 109
5/27-8/3 Tu 3:00pm-5:00pm and time by arrangement
Markey, Patrick
Email: patrick.markey@villanova.edu
By permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for a maximum total of 9 credits. This course provides a means of engaging in applied fieldwork in psychology. By working in a community agency, school, hospital or other social service or psychology institution, students gain first-hand experiences that will enhance their understanding of psychology. This course consists of: working in an unpaid placement for 8 hours a week for 10 weeks, receiving feedback from a trained supervisor at the placement, participating in class meetings each week, completing weekly reflection papers, and a final class paper and presentation. An emphasis is placed on preparation for graduate school and/ or a future career in the field of psychology (e.g., resume development, etc.). The instructor will provide readings to complement the applied experience and help students understand the career they hope to pursue. Upon completion of the course, you should possess a comprehensive understanding of what an applied job in the field of psychology entails and a better understanding of the relations between psychological theory and practice.

Advanced Independent Study in Psychology (Cr.BA)
50:830:494:Sec.A1:01215
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: chmarkey@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, but only 9 credits can be applied toward the major requirements. Students are required to undertake a semester-long or yearlong laboratory or library project under the supervision of a member of the department. Strongly recommended for students planning to attend graduate school.

Advanced Independent Study in Psychology (Cr.BA)
50:830:494:Sec.D1:00725
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: chmarkey@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, but only 9 credits can be applied toward the major requirements. Students are required to undertake a semester-long or yearlong laboratory or library project under the supervision of a member of the department. Strongly recommended for students planning to attend graduate school.

Advanced Independent Study in Psychology (Cr.BA)
50:830:494:Sec.D2:02801
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: chmarkey@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, but only 9 credits can be applied toward the major requirements. Students are required to undertake a semester-long or yearlong laboratory or library project under the supervision of a member of the department. Strongly recommended for students planning to attend graduate school.

Advanced Independent Study in Psychology (Cr.BA)
50:830:494:Sec.H1:00961
7/7-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: chmarkey@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit, but only 9 credits can be applied toward the major requirements. Students are required to undertake a semester-long or yearlong laboratory or library project under the supervision of a member of the department. Strongly recommended for students planning to attend graduate school.

Back to List.


RELIGION

Introduction to World Religion (G) (Cr.3)
50:840:130:Sec.A2:05253 ATG 225
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Banner, Kenneth
Email: banner@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion or Global General Requirement. A general introduction to the basic religious concerns of humanity and the ways in which religions have developed in Eastern and Western history, giving intellectual, moral, and institutional expression to the meaning of human existence.

Introduction to the Bible (Cr.3)
50:840:110:Sec.D2:05254 Hist Seminar
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Wall, John
Email: johnwall@camden.rutgers.edu
Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. Historical and literary exploration of portions of the Tanakh (Old Testament) and New Testament that have had the most lasting influence on Western culture. Focus on the meaning of key terms like covenant and evil, biblical authorship, and different ways the text may be interpreted today.

Magic and Ritual Power (Cr.3)
50:840:363:Sec.H1:05255 eCollege
5/27-7/3 Time by arrangement
Banner, Kenneth
Email: banner@camden.rutgers.edu
Online support fee of $100. Satisfies the History/Philosophy/Religion General Requirement. An examination of magic throughout history and today in ritual, community, literature, film, television, and personal spirituality. Is magic a form of religion? Are religious rituals forms of magic? How can magic be defined? What is its power? Such questions are asked across diverse practices and beliefs such as in Judaism, Christianity, Wicca, and paganism.

Independent Study in Religion (Cr.3)
50:840:389:Sec.T1:02399
5/27-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: scharme@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Advanced students pursue a research topic under the direction of a faculty member, culminating in a paper.

Back to List.


SOCIOLOGY

Sociology of the Family (Cr.3)
50:920:306:Sec.A1:05257 ATG 101
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Isamah, Augustine
Email: isamah@camden.rutgers.edu
A comparative study of the institutions of marriage and the family in various societies with special emphasis on the contemporary American family.

Race and Ethnicity (Cr.3)
50:920:316:Sec.D6:05258 ATG 101
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Isamah, Augustine
Email: isamah@camden.rutgers.edu
The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.

Individual and Society (Cr.3)
50:920:357:Sec.D2:05260 ATG 206
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Saltzman, Cynthia
Email: cynthias@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:920:207 or 50:070:213. The individual's relationship to society and society's impact on the individual. Topics include Western notions of the self and the relationship to capitalism, class, and the family; conceptions of the person in other parts of the world (such as Bali, Japan, and Samoa); symbolic interaction and how the self is constituted in social interaction; the performance of the self in everyday life; framing of social experience through play and ritual; and being another through spirit possession.

Individual Study in Sociology (Cr.BA)
50:920:487:Sec.A1:00771
5/27-6/20 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: humphri@camden.rutgers.edu
Admission requires permission of department and agreement by a department member to supervise the work. Approval of written proposal is required prior to registration. No more than 6 credits can be counted toward the sociology major.

Individual Study in Sociology (Cr.BA)
50:920:487:Sec.D1:00834
6/23-7/18 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: humphri@camden.rutgers.edu
Admission requires permission of department and agreement by a department member to supervise the work. Approval of written proposal is required prior to registration. No more than 6 credits can be counted toward the sociology major.

Individual Study in Sociology (Cr.BA)
50:920:487:Sec.J1:00957
7/21-8/13 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: humphri@camden.rutgers.edu
Admission requires permission of department and agreement by a department member to supervise the work. Approval of written proposal is required prior to registration. No more than 6 credits can be counted toward the sociology major.

Back to List.


STATISTICS

Introduction to Statistics I (Cr.3)
50:960:283:Sec.A2:00297 ATG 224
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Kushary, Debashis
Email: kushary@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:121 or 130. Intended primarily for business majors and information systems/computer science majors. Introductory course in the theory and methods of statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, random variables and probability distribution, binomial and normal distributions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and testing of hypotheses on mean(s) and proportion(s).

Introduction to Statistics I (Cr.3)
50:960:283:Sec.A6:02279 ATG 224
5/27-6/20 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Leiderman, Dmitry
Email: leidermd@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:121 or 130. Intended primarily for business majors and information systems/computer science majors. Introductory course in the theory and methods of statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, random variables and probability distribution, binomial and normal distributions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and testing of hypotheses on mean(s) and proportion(s).

Introduction to Statistics I (Cr.3)
50:960:283:Sec.D6:02279 ATG 223
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Ward, Michael
Email: miward@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:640:121 or 130. Intended primarily for business majors and information systems/computer science majors. Introductory course in the theory and methods of statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, random variables and probability distribution, binomial and normal distributions, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and testing of hypotheses on mean(s) and proportion(s).

Introduction to Statistics II (Cr.3)
50:960:284:Sec.D2:00357 ATG 224
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-1:30pm
Kushary, Debashis
Email: kushary@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:960:283. Intended primarily for business majors and information systems/computer science majors. A second introductory statistics course. Emphasizes the application of statistical techniques to data analysis. Topics include analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, simple linear regression, correlation, multiple regression, time series, and index numbers.

Introduction to Statistics II (Cr.3)
50:960:284:Sec.J6:00754 ATG 223
7/21-8/13 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Kushary, Debashis
Email: kushary@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 50:960:283. Intended primarily for business majors and information systems/computer science majors. A second introductory statistics course. Emphasizes the application of statistical techniques to data analysis. Topics include analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, simple linear regression, correlation, multiple regression, time series, and index numbers.

Back to List.


URBAN STUDIES

Special Topics in Urban Studies: International Perspectives on Urban Issues (Cr.3)
50:975:384:Sec.B2:05267 BSB 133
5/27-7/3 M,Tu,W,Th 10:50am-12:40pm
Staff
Email: lori.minnite@rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 3/20/14.
This course introduces students to key theories, concepts, and principles in urban planning and revitalization applied across different geographic regions. The course is grounded in the understanding that the urban environment is created through a dynamic interaction between geographic, political, economic, and social factors. Drawing on international case studies students will critically examine how these factors influence the planning and revitalization process and gain an appreciation for alternative planning and revitalization strategies.

Special Topics in Urban Studies: Race and Urban Culture (Cr.3)
50:975:386:Sec.D1:05268 ATG 206
6/23-7/18 M,Tu,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Staff
Email: lori.minnite@rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 3/20/14.
Although much of the discussion about race tries to distance itself from stereotyping and negative perceptions of urban poverty, urban communities continue to be plagued by racism. This course seeks to excavate the roots of a racialized urban poor and the persistence of belief in a “culture of poverty." Students will engage classical theories about the urban community to explore ideas about race in the popular culture, as evidenced by portrayals of urban life in the HBO series The Corner and The Wire.

Back to List.