RUTGERS UNIVERSITY – CAMDEN

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SUMMER SESSION OFFICE
Armitage Hall, First Floor
311 North Fifth St.
Camden, NJ 08102
856-225-6098
FAX: 856-225-6453
summercm@camden.rutgers.edu





GRADUATE ARTS AND SCIENCES

BIOLOGY, M.S., M.S.T.

Field Ecology (Cr.3)
56:120:514:Sec.D1:05539 Pinelands
6/29-7/10 M,Tu,W,Th, F 9:00am-1:30pm
Dighton, John
Email: dighton@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Cross listed with 50:120:395. Note special schedule. Off-campus course at the Pineland Research Station in New Lisbon, NJ. The course is designed to immerse students in the practicalities of conducting ecological research. The course introduces the basis of a number of sampling methodologies in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and some of the basic statistics needed to design and interpret data from field surveys and collections. The course is hands-on and in the field. The course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

Special Topics in Biology: Advanced Marine Field Ecology (Cr.3)
56:120:596:Sec.E1:05540 Florida Keys
7/1-7/21 Time by arrangement; trip to Florida 7/6-7/16
Vagelli, Alejandro
Email: avagelli@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marine Field Ecology, or by permission of instructor. Off campus course held in Florida Keys. Additional fees will apply. Trip is July 6-July 16. This is an intensive advance field 10-days summer session course which will be held at Sugarloaf, and Kudjoe Keys, FL. The course main goal is to provide opportunities for students to apply knowledge and field techniques previously learned on specific marine biology research, which is hoped will lead to developing of research thesis projects and scientific publications. The fieldwork will focus on ecological, taxonomic, and conservation aspects of main communities such as seagrass beds, mangrove forests, and coral reefs. Students will apply previously learned field and laboratory methods, including transect sampling and larval rearing of various marine invertebrates. In addition they will conduct field and laboratory work aimed to investigate the putative occurrence of a new species of polychaete, observed at an early ontogenetic stage, in a previous fieldwork, as well as its taxonomic determination and study of its complete life cycle. Also, the course will focus on the observed association between palinurid lobsters and a several species of demospongids in Kudjoe Key Bay. This is an intensive course that aims to train and prepare students for real marine field ecology work. Daily activities will start at dawn and will extend well into the evenings with laboratory sessions and discussions. Potential field trips include: Lew Key Marine Sanctuary and Mote Marine Lab.

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COMPUTATIONAL AND INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY, Ph.D.

Dissertation Research (Cr.BA)
56:121:710:Sec.T1:02887
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: piccoli@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Research toward the doctoral degree in computational and integrative biology.

Curricula Practical Training(Cr.1)
56:121:720:Sec.T1:05807
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Yakoby, Nir
Email: yakoby@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Curricular practical training (CPT) is work experience which is required to complete one's degree program or must offer credit that will count toward a student's degree requirements. In this case, students may participate in this training course as part of their degree. This may include internships, cooperative education programs, directed research or independent study.

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CHEMISTRY, M.S.

Individual Study in Chemistry (Cr.BA)
56:160:619:Sec.A1:02679
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: arbuckle@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Designed for students conducting original projects in chemistry either as part of the thesis research or for the nonthesis option. The project is designed and conducted in consultation with a sponsor from, or designated by, the graduate faculty. Nonthesis students complete 2 credits culminating in a written term paper and oral presentation before the graduate faculty. Generally thesis students complete at least 4 credits culminating in a written thesis and seminar presentation.

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CREATIVE WRITING, M.F.A.

Summer Writers Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:525:Sec.D1:01308
6/22-7/1 Time by arrangement
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor - competitive admission. Note special schedule - meets 6/22-7/1. Students may repeat for credit under course numbers 200:526 and 200:527. The 30th Annual SUMMER WRITERS' CONFERENCE, June 22-July 1, is an intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner via email at zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu. Please visit website: http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information.

Summer Writers Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:526:Sec.D1:01309
6/22-7/1 Time by arrangement
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor - competitive admission. Note special schedule - meets 6/22-7/1. Students may repeat for credit under course numbers 200:526 and 200:527. The 30th Annual SUMMER WRITERS' CONFERENCE, June 22-July 1, is an intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner via email at zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu. Please visit website: http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information.

Summer Writers Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:527:Sec.D1:02797
6/22-7/1 Time by arrangement
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor - competitive admission. Note special schedule - meets 6/22-7/1. Students may repeat for credit under course numbers 200:526 and 200:527. The 30th Annual SUMMER WRITERS' CONFERENCE, June 22-July 1, is an intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner via email at zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu. Please visit website: http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information.

Special Topics in Craft: Writing From Life (Cr.3)
56:200:571:Sec.A1:03472 eCollege
5/26-6/20 Time by arrangement
Grodstein, Lauren
Email: lgrodste@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in eCollege. Online course fee of $100. Crosslisted with 50:989:390, 56:606:612. This course encourages students to use their own memories to create fiction, nonfiction, and other literary forms. Students will read personal reporting covering a wide range of experiences, including war, travel, illness, heartbreak, and parenting, and learn ways to distill their own lives into narrative. Students are responsible for submitting four short pieces (3– 5 pages) addressing episodes in their own lives, as well as posting Sakai responses to their reading.

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ENGLISH, M.A.

Victorian Literature (Cr. 3)
56:350:571:Sec.A1:05302 ATG 207
5/26-6/18 M,T,W,Th 8:00am-10:40am
Fiske, Shanyn
Email:fiske@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 5/18/15
Cross-listed with 50:350:324. A thematic and analytic approach to the major prose and poetry of the period, with emphasis on the works of Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, Arnold, Carlyle, and Ruskin.

Special Topics: Poetry of Modernism and Post Modernism (Cr.3)
56:350:593:Sec.H6:03576 ATG 218
7/7-8/12 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Barbarese, Joseph
Email: barbares@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:350:393, 56:606:610. An in-depth study of poetic developments in English and American poetry from Yeats to the present, the course begins with an overview of the backgrounds of Modernism in Whitman and Tennyson and the Romantics, then confronts the poetry of the High Modernists (Yeats, Pound , Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Lawrence, Hart Crane), and continues past mid-century into Post-Modernism, with readings in Ginsberg, Plath, Ashbery and others. We will place emphasis on the philosophical and political contexts of the writers. A particular interest of the course, informed by the candidacy examination reading lists, is in the long poem—from The Waste Land, "Sunday Morning," portions of The Cantos, and The Bridge up to and including Ginsberg’s "Howl," Ashbery’s "The Skaters" and Ammons’ Tape for the Turn of the Year. We will also attempt to produce a synthetic view of the Romantic and the Modernist periods as reflected in criticism of the past two decades. Two papers and a class presentation.

Studies in American Literature (Cr.3)
56:352:509:Sec.D6:05611 ATG 226
6/22-7/16 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Singley, Carol
Email:singley@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:352:391, 56:606:611. Selected major writers from Anne Bradstreet and John Winthrop to William Faulkner and Toni Morrison, seen in their historical or intellectual contexts. Attention to literary form, American mythologies, and Transatlantic dialogue. All works on the syllabus are drawn from the M.A. Candidacy Exam reading lists. An oral presentation, a short paper, and a longer paper.

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HISTORY, M.A.

Internship in Public History (Cr.BA)
56:512:699:Sec.J1:01812
7/20-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: shankman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Supervised work experience in a public history office or private institutional setting, involving project work for one semester or a summer.

Internship in Public History (Cr.BA)
56:512:699:Sec.T1:01765
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: shankman@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Supervised work experience in a public history office or private institutional setting, involving project work for one semester or a summer.

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LIBERAL STUDIES, M.A.

Studies of the Arts and Literature: Representations of War in 19th and 20th Century American Literature (Cr.3)
56:606:608:Sec.B6:05409 JBMDL+Sakai
5/19-7/2 Tu 6:00pm-8:50pm and time by arrangement
Drucker, Richard
Email:richmdrucker@yahoo.com
COURSE CANCELLED 5/11/15.
Off campus course at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. Hybrid course in Sakai with partial online component. Note special schedule. This course will focus on four novels, written by Americans, beginning in the nineteenth century, through the mid twentieth century. It will look at and evaluate the historical and literary contexts for each novel, and determine the socio-cultural conditions that form a background for each work. We will engage in close readings of each work to evaluate the content, style, themes, and point of view of each work. We will also investigate the critical reception of each novel and attempt to gauge each work’s relationship to a specifically American war literature tradition, but also to enlarge our understanding of the universal elements of this genre. Students will write brief response essays, one analytic essay (3-6 pages) based on a particular aspect of one novel, and a longer research based essay that uses academic and literary sources as part of its argument. Readings will include: Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, Ernest Hemingway’s Farewell to Arms, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five and Tim O’Brien’s Going After Cacciato. Additional short readings will be available in photocopies.

Studies of the Arts and Literature: Modern Art (Cr.3)
56:606:609:Sec.H6:05411 JBMDL+Sakai
7/6-8/19 W 6:00pm-8:50pm and time by arrangement
Quideau, Florence
Email:quid24@aol.com
Off campus course at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. Hybrid course in Sakai with partial online component. Note special schedule. This course will explore the development and transformation of art of the 20th century in Europe and the United States. Students will explore the groundbreaking artistic movements, including Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, and Environmental Art.  The analysis of key works by influential artists and the investigation of the socio-political and historical contexts that shaped Modern Art will lead to a clear understanding of innovative artistic styles. No previous knowledge of Art History is required.

Studies of the Arts and Literature: Poetry of Modernism and Post Modernism (Cr.3)
56:606:610:Sec.H6:04933 ATG 218
7/6-8/11 Tu, Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Barbarese, Joseph
Email:barbares@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:350:395, 56:350:593. An in-depth study of poetic developments in English and American poetry from Yeats to the present, the course begins with an overview of the backgrounds of Modernism in Whitman and Tennyson and the Romantics, then confronts the poetry of the High Modernists (Yeats, Pound , Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Lawrence, Hart Crane), and continues past mid-century into Post-Modernism, with readings in Ginsberg, Plath, Ashbery and others. We will place emphasis on the philosophical and political contexts of the writers. A particular interest of the course, informed by the candidacy examination reading lists, is in the long poem—from The Waste Land, "Sunday Morning," portions of The Cantos, and The Bridge up to and including Ginsberg’s "Howl," Ashbery’s "The Skaters" and Ammons’ Tape for the Turn of the Year. We will also attempt to produce a synthetic view of the Romantic and the Modernist periods as reflected in criticism of the past two decades. Two papers and a class presentation.

Studies of the Arts and Literature: Studies in American Literature(Cr.3)
56:606:611:Sec.D6:04931 ATG 226
6/22-7/16 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Singley, Carol
Email:singley@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:352:391, 56:352:509. Selected major writers from Anne Bradstreet and John Winthrop to William Faulkner and Toni Morrison, seen in their historical or intellectual contexts. Attention to literary form, American mythologies, and Transatlantic dialogue. All works on the syllabus are drawn from the M.A. Candidacy Exam reading lists. An oral presentation, a short paper, and a longer paper.

Studies of the Arts and Literature: Writing from Life (Cr.3)
56:606:612:Sec.A1:04937 eCollege
5/26-6/18 Time by arrangement
Grodstein, Lauren
Email:grodstein@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in eCollege for Pearson's students. Cross-listed with 50:989:307, 56:200:571. By permission of instructor. This course encourages students to use their own memories to create fiction, nonfiction, and other literary forms. Students will read personal reporting covering a wide range of experiences, including war, travel, illness, heartbreak, and parenting, and learn ways to distill their own lives into narrative. Students are responsible for submitting four short pieces (3- 5 pages) addressing episodes in their own lives, as well as posting Sakai responses to their reading.

Studies in Philosophy and Religion: Philosophy and Film (Cr.3)
56:606:642:Sec.HP:05413 eCollege
7/6-8/12 Time by arrangement
Young, Ed
Email:profyoung@verizon.net
Online course in eCollege format. Online course support fee of $100. Literally meaning "The love of wisdom," philosophy requires reflection on what is important in life. Since our own experience is always limited, it is important to consider experiences beyond our own. Films offer perspectives on how life might be experienced differently, often addressing philosophical themes in the process. So our class will be dedicated to philosophical reflection on themes like skepticism, relativism, personal identity, and determinism as represented in popular film.

Studies in Non-Western Cultures and Societies: Health and Healing in Africa (Cr.3)
56:606:681:Sec.BP:05412 eCollege
5/26-7/2 Time by arrangement
Nicholson
Email:nicholta@delhi.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 5/18/15
Online course in eCollege format. Online course support fee of $100. This class will use the concept of health and healing to examine larger social, economic and political trends in Africa.  Focusing on diseases such as Ebola, HIV/AIDS and cholera, and by examining such topics as traditional healing, reproductive health and inoculations, this class will highlight changes and continuities that Africans experienced over the last two hundred years.  A range of primary and secondary sources will be used to highlight African concerns , outside stereotypes, local responses to changing medical views and African agency with regard to health and healing. The class will link notions of health and healing with the colonial and postcolonial state and global changes. Students will be expected to post weekly forum responses, upload weekly small papers and develop an argumentative essay over the course of the class.

Research in Liberal Studies (Cr.3)
56:606:689:Sec.H1:00786
7/6-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email:scharme@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student, under the supervision of an adviser chosen in consultation with the program director. If this course is taken for one semester, the project culminates in a paper about 20-25 pages in length. If the course is taken for two semesters, a more substantial paper is required.

Research in Liberal Studies (Cr.3)
56:606:689:Sec.T1:01239
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email:scharme@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student, under the supervision of an adviser chosen in consultation with the program director. If this course is taken for one semester, the project culminates in a paper about 20-25 pages in length. If the course is taken for two semesters, a more substantial paper is required.

Research in Liberal Studies (Cr.3)
56:606:701:Sec.T1:00664
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email:scharme@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student, under the supervision of an adviser chosen in consultation with the program director. If this course is taken for one semester, the project culminates in a paper about 20-25 pages in length. If the course is taken for two semesters, a more substantial paper is required.

Research in Liberal Studies (Cr.3)
56:606:701:Sec.T2:00654
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email:scharme@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student, under the supervision of an adviser chosen in consultation with the program director. If this course is taken for one semester, the project culminates in a paper about 20-25 pages in length. If the course is taken for two semesters, a more substantial paper is required.

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MATHEMATICS, M.A.

Special Topics in Pure Math: A Dynamical Systems Approach to Combinatorial Number Theory (Cr. 3)
56:645:570:Sec.H5:05276 FA 242
7/6-8/12 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Nerurkar, Mahesh
Email: nmahesh@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 6/29.
Discrete dynamical systems, notions of minimal sets and almost periodic points, proximal pairs, examples of rotatioons on circle and their isometric extensions, shift dynamical systems of various type, recurrence, sets of recurrence, uniform distributions and equi-distribution of sequences, Methods of topological dynamics, ultrafilters compactification and it consequences in dynamics, Ramsey theory and combinatorial number theory. Some background in Analysis/Advanced Calculus is necessary.

Independent Study in Pure Mathematics (Cr.3)
56:645:698:Sec.T1:00536
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: haydeeh@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Study of a particular subject independently but with frequent consultations with a faculty member.

Independent Studies in Applied Mathematics (Cr.3)
56:645:699:Sec.T1:00528
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: haydeeh@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Study of a particular subject independently but with frequent consultations with a faculty member.

Thesis in Applied Mathematics (Cr.3)
56:645:701:Sec.T1:01338
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: haydeeh@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Expository paper written under the close guidance of a faculty member.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY, D.P.T.

Foundations I (Cr.1)
56:742:501:Sec.K1:01266
5/26-8/4 Time by arrangement
Krencicki,Dennise and Handler, Jodi
Email:krencidb@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course introduces medical terminology and the basic principles of patient care. Emphasis will be on a theoretical understanding of the physical principles of massage and the acquisition of psychomotor skills needed to apply this intervention. Concepts of evidence-based practice, the Disablement Models, the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and the Patient/Client Management Model are introduced. Lecture, demonstration and case-based approach will be utilized in the classroom and laboratory.

Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Therapy I (Cr.3)
56:742:505:Sec.K1:01264
5/26-8/4 Time by arrangement
Nardone, Marie Koval
Email: mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course introduces the student to the psychosocial aspects of physical therapy and to the clinical decision-making process which is utilized by the physical therapist. Patient and family members’ responses to illness and loss are explored. Communication and interpersonal skills, cultural awareness, strategies for therapeutic intervention, and the ability to engage in reflective thinking are stressed. Lecture, discussion, role-playing, journal writing, written assignments, individual and group projects are utilized.

Human Anatomy (Cr.5)
56:742:510:Sec.K1:01265
5/26-8/4 Time by arrangement
Speirs, Michael and Muth, Stephanie
Email:muth@shrp.rutgers.edu
Regional study of gross structure of the human body with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system. Laboratory experience includes dissection of human cadavers.

Scientific Inquiry (Cr.3)
56:742:614:Sec.B1:01347
5/26-7/2 Time by arrangement
Bross, Theodore and Ferraro, Richard
Email:ferraro@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts underlying the research process. Basic concepts of research design and approaches are examined in answering clinically relevant questions. Applied statistics are discussed. An overview of the knowledge and skills necessary for the student to critically analyze the literature is emphasized in the format of lecture, discussion, classroom assignments, and modified case studies. Whenever possible, computer applications will be introduced as will examples from the health research literature.

Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy II (Cr.2)
56:742:616:Sec.B1:00504
5/26-7/2 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email:dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is a continuation of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy I with a focus on special topics in cardiopulmonary physical therapy, dysrhythmia interpretation, acute care and intensive care medicine, mechanical ventilation, and managing the medically complex individual.

Medical Considerations in Rehabilitation III (Cr.2)
56:742:618:Sec.B1:01331
5/26-7/2 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email:dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an understanding of the pathophysiology and medical science of infectious diseases, endocrine disorders, nutritional supplements, ergogenic aides, pain and inflammation, mental illness, and substance abuse along with the basic pharmacologic and medical interventions utilized to manage these conditions as applicable to physical therapy practice. A basic introduction to medical screening is also introduced.

Clinical Education I (Cr.3)
56:742:619:Sec.H1:00505
7/7-8/12 Time by arrangement
Krencicki, Dennise and Simonds, Adrienne
Email:krencidb@shrp.rutgers.edu simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
First full time internship to provide experience in a clinical setting in one of the following areas: acute care, adult or pediatric rehabilitation (hospital based or outpatient), orthopedic or other clinical setting that may include a special interest practice. Internships are located at contracted clinical facilities in New Jersey and throughout the United States.

Clinical Education I (Cr.3)
56:742:619:Sec.H2:03298
7/7-8/12 Time by arrangement
Krencicki, Dennise and Simonds, Adrienne
Email:krencidb@shrp.rutgers.edu simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
First full time internship to provide experience in a clinical setting in one of the following areas: acute care, adult or pediatric rehabilitation (hospital based or outpatient), orthopedic or other clinical setting that may include a special interest practice. Internships are located at contracted clinical facilities in New Jersey and throughout the United States.

Professional Issues I (Cr.2)
56:742:630:Sec.C1:01330
5/26-7/18 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Emailsimondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
Introduction to physical therapy. Discussion of issues including development and history of the profession and professional association, review of professional licensure, introduction to health professionals and other legal practice issues. Includes an introduction to clinical education. Students engage in service learning through the Migrant Farm Worker’s Project.

Differential Diagnosis and Medical Screening (Cr.2)
56:742:701:Sec.C1:01460
5/26-7/18 Time by arrangement
Kietrys, David
Email:kietrydm@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is designed to prepare the student to practice physical therapy in primary care or autonomous practice settings through an in-depth look at the science of medical screening and differential diagnosis. The course incorporates screening tools previously learned across the curriculum with an emphasis on pathology and identification of disease states which may fall outside of the scope of physical therapy practice.

Education (Cr.2)
56:742:702:Sec.C1:01461
5/26-7/18 Time by arrangement
Nardone, Marie Koval and Handler, Jodi
Email:mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course introduces the student to principles of teaching and learning. Students will learn theoretical concepts of education and practical applications. Lecture, discussion, journal writing, written assignments, individual and group projects and presentations are utilized.

Wellness and Health (Cr.2)
56:742:716:Sec.C1:01462
5/26-7/18 Time by arrangement
Muth, Stephanie
Email:muthst@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an in-depth look at the concepts of health promotion, secondary prevention, and wellness as it applies to healthy individuals as well as individuals with chronic disease and disability. Students are instructed in the skills required to research, design, and implement wellness programs aimed at prevention of disease and disability.

Medical Considerations in Rehabilitation IV (Cr.2)
56:742:717:Sec.C1:01463
5/26-7/18 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Email:simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an understanding of the pathophysiology and medical science of the disorders of the integumentary system (wound and burn care), endocrine and metabolic systems (diabetes, obesity), renal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and hepatic disorders. The course considers autoimmune and infectious diseases (HIV and AIDs), the relationship between the medical interventions, including pharmacology, and the impact on physical therapy is discussed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T1:01459
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Cohen, Evan
Email:cohenet@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T2:01579
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email:dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T3:01578
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Ferraro, Richard
Email:ferrari@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T4:01629
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Kietrys, David
Email: kietrydm@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T5:01933
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Muth, Stephanie
Email:muthst@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T6:02268
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Email:simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive and well-written review of the literature on the topic that was selected in Applied Research I and II and develop a poster presentation based on the paper that they developed.

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EXECUTIVE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Organizational Behavior (Cr.3)
56:831:505:Sec.A1:02713 Avalon
6/8-6/12 Time by arrangement
Olshfski, Dorothy
Email: olshfski@gmail.com
Open only to EMPA Cohort students. Taught off-campus at the Golden Inn in Avalon, NJ. Additional fee of $750. Examines organization behavior-of individuals and groups/teams-and the organization context in which that behavior takes place. Organization theories as well as behavior theories and approaches discussed, including seminal historical works and more current treatments.

Ethics in Government (Cr.3)
56:831:559:Sec.A1:02696 Avalon
6/8-6/12 Time by arrangement
Bush-Baskette, Stephanie
Email: sbushbask@aol.com
Open only to EMPA Cohort students. Taught off-campus at the Golden Inn in Avalon, NJ. Additional fee of $750. This course examines organizational and individual responses to ethical issues at work. The class will use cases, interviews, film and lecture to explore problematic situations through the different lenses employed in the ethics literature.

Research Workshop (Cr.3)
56:831:675:Sec.T1:02697
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangmenet
McGuire, Angie
Email: angmcg@docs.rutgers.edu
Open only to EMPA Cohort students. Students register for the capstone requirement as part of the Summer program, however, the course runs through the remainder of the Fall semester. The final capstone paper will reflect and integrate concepts covered in all courses. Guides students in formulating, researching and writing a capstone research paper. Integrates the skills and concepts from the core courses as students use quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze a selected policy or administrative problem.

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PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION, M.P.A.

Foundations of Policy Analysis (Cr.3)
56:834:501:Sec.J6:05431 ATG 224
7/20-8/12 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Schrader, William
Email: william.schrader@rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 7/14.
The logic of action, decision making, and belief; epistemological issues underlying scientific and policy research; causality, probability, statistics, and public policy; the role of problem definition, description, theory, model building, explanation, and prediction in policy research and decision making. Reviews major substantive theories of public choice and public policymaking and critically examines them from a logical and theoretical perspective.

Public Management (Cr.3)
56:834:525:Sec.D1:05432 Sakai
6/22-7/16 Time by arrangement
Mareschal, Patricia
Email: marescha@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai. Online course support fee of $100. This course examines contemporary management approaches, techniques, and skills for managing various kinds of public organizations. Decision making, administrative leadership, planning, implementation, evaluation, and ethics are key topics.

Internship I (Cr.3)
56:834:541:Sec.B1:05612
5/26-7/2 Time by arrangement
Serico, Joseph
Email: jserico@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Direct experience with public agencies; individual internships, under faculty supervision, in policymaking agencies.

Human Resources Management(Cr.3)
56:834:557:Sec.A1:05433 Sakai
5/26-6/18 Time by arrangement
Blessett, Brandi
Email: bb520@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai. Online course support fee of $100. Examines the relationship between employers, employees, and their labor relations organizations in government and the nonprofit sector. Focuses on the roles of leadership and direction of employees and the impact of collective negotiations on critical issues of public policy and civil service organizations.

Executive Leadership and Communication Skills (Cr.3)
56:834:558:Sec.D6:05436 ATG 224
6/22-7/16 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Schrader, William
Email: william.schrader@rutgers.edu
Strengths and limitations of various leadership theories. Awareness of personal learning, leadership, influence, and communication styles. Develops leadership skills through interpersonal exercises and through course projects involving current managerial and political issues. Communication skills involving writing, speaking, meetings, media relations, and strategic planning emphasized.

Labor Management Relations in the Private and Public Sector (Cr.3)
56:834:570:Sec.A6:03583 ATG 221+Sakai
5/26-6/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm + Hybrid
Mareschal, Patricia
Email: marescha@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 5/18/15
Hybrid course with partial online component. Analysis of the structure and development of labor-management relationships in the United States and abroad, focusing on both private industry and governmental organizations. Explores history and the surrounding law while focusing on the negotiation and administration of collective bargaining agreements, related micro- and macroeconomic problems, and issues that accompany the growth of the nonunion sector in both private and public sectors.

Colloquium in Public Policy and Administration: Effective Local Government Management (Cr.3)
56:834:606:Sec.A6:05437 ATG 223+Sakai
5/26-6/18 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Schultz, Christopher
Email: topherschultz@verizon.net
COURSE CANCELLED 5/18/15
Hybrid course in Sakai with partial online component. Public management is important in our democratic society. Students will gain a perspective of that importance by focusing on public management theories affecting the field, changing structures of local government, and the relationship of politics and administration. We will look at the role of public management in a democratic society, the interplay between public administrators and elected officials, the environment, roles and responsibilities of local government leaders, policy makers, and the governing body, as well as the future of local government administration. Throughout this course, we will explore public management as described above through readings, assignments, classroom discussions, case studies and field assignments. .

Research Workshop (Cr.3)
56:834:675:Sec.T1:05439
5/26-8/12 Time by arrangement
McGuire, Angie
Email: angmcg@docs.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Guides students in formulating, researching, and writing a capstone research paper. Integrates the skills and concepts from the core courses as students use quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze a selected policy or administrative problem. Students must have completed 21 M.P.A. credits.

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SOCIAL WORK, M.S.W.

Methods of Social Work Research II (Cr.3)
19:910CM:595:Sec.P7:01673 CSW 212
5/26-7/2 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm
Kim, S.
Pre-requisites: Successful completion of professional foundation courses and statistics requirement. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of agency programs and individual practice. Participation in hands-on, small-group research projects to cover all phases of the research process, and use of computer technology.

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MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING SPANISH (MAT)

Teaching Spanish Literature for Teachers I (Cr.3)
56:940:523:Sec.J6:05655 ATG 206+Sakai
7/20-8/11 Tu 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Laguna, Ana
Email: alaguna@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with partial online content. Cross-listed with 50:940:391. This course considers literature as a fascinating journey often lost in the dry requirements of a mandatory course. Through wide-ranging strategies that transcend pedagogy, theory, and research, this seminar proposes ways to immerse and engage students in a literary practice. The course is divided in four sections: "Teaching and Learning Literature: Understanding Tradition, Rethinking Practice," "Expanding the Canon” "How to Talk and Write About Spanish/Latin American Literature" and "Writing Assignments and Assessment in Literature Classes: Perennial Problems and Provisional Solutions." Students taking this course will be able to develop innovating ways of planning, delivering and assessing the effectiveness of lectures and discussions in literature courses. Topics that will be discussed include how to resolve and maximize the challenges posed in teaching a text in a second language; the issues associated with teaching a text from a little-known language/cultural tradition/time period; and the difficulties of teaching a foreign language through its literary masterpieces.

Special Topics in Teaching Spanish: Peer Interaction in the Foreign-Language Classroom (Cr.3)
56:940:592:Sec.H6:05656 ATG 220+Sakai
7/6-8/12 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Moranski, Kara
Email:moranski@sas.upenn.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 6/29.
Hybrid course in Sakai with some online component. This course will examine the evidence supporting contemporary best practices for designing and facilitating pair and small-group interactions in the foreign-language classroom. Recent classroom-based research will serve as a basis from which to explore how various interactional patterns correlate with subsequent language-learning outcomes. Students will investigate the concepts of active learning, inverted classroom models, in-group power dynamics, and analytical talk in the L1, all within the context of classroom social settings. This course will also consider the numerous cultural, environmental, and individual factors that contribute to learners? in-group behavior. Students in this hybrid course will take a highly active role in their own learning process as they apply novel developments from the field of second-language acquisition to (1) reflect upon and critically examine their existing beliefs and experiences with classroom peer interaction and to (2) apply insights gained to their own Spanish language teaching and assessment practices.

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