RUTGERS UNIVERSITY – CAMDEN

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SUMMER SESSION OFFICE
Armitage Hall, First Floor
311 North Fifth St.
Camden, NJ 08102
856-225-6053
FAX: 856-225-6453
summercm@camden.rutgers.edu





GRADUATE ARTS AND SCIENCES

BIOLOGY, M.S., M.S.T.

Field Ecology (Cr.3)
56:120:514:Sec.D1:05497 Pinelands
6/27-7/8 M,Tu,W,Th,F 9:00am-1:30pm
Gray, Dennis
Email: dmgray@rci.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Cross listed with 50:120:395. Note special schedule. Off-campus course at the Pineland Research Station in New Lisbon, NJ. The course is designed to immerse students in the practicalities of conducting ecological research. The course introduces the basis of a number of sampling methodologies in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and some of the basic statistics needed to design and interpret data from field surveys and collections. The course is hands-on and in the field. The course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

Special Topics in Biology: Marine Field Ecology (Cr.3)
56:120:596:Sec.E1:05498 Florida Keys
7/1-7/31 Time by arrangement; trip to Florida 7/6-7/16
Vagelli, Alejandro
Email: avagelli@camden.rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Ecology, Marine Biology, or by permission of instructor. Off campus course held in Florida Keys. Additional fees will apply. Trip is tentatively dated July 6-July 16 - contact instructor for complete information. This is an intensive field 10-days summer session course which will be held at Sugarloaf, and Kudjoe Keys, FL. This course aims to train and prepare students for marine field ecology work, and will provide opportunities for students to gain hands-on experience in marine biology research. The fieldwork will focus on ecological, taxonomic, and conservation aspects of main communities such as seagress beds, mangrove forests, and coral reefs. Students will become familiar with field methods for ecological and conservation studies, including sampling techniques and census work. Students will design and conduct field observations and experiments aimed to answer questions concerning specific topics, iwhich include trophic structure, reproductive strategies, recruitment, fish behavior, co-evolutionary relationships, energy cycling, and detrimental impacts of human activities. Daily activities will extend into the evenings with laboratory sessions and discussions. Potential field trips include: Lew Key Marine Sanctuary and Mote Marine Lab. For more details, see http://marinefieldecologyrutgerscamden.blogspot.com.

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COMPUTATIONAL AND INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY, M.S., Ph.D.

Curricular Practical Training (Cr.1)
56:121:720:Sec.T1:05692
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Yakoby, Nir
Email: yakoby@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Curricular practical training (CPT) is work experience which is required to complete one's degree program or must offer credit that will count toward a student's degree requirements. In this case, students may participate in this training course as part of their degree. This may include internships, cooperative education programs, directed research or independent study.

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CREATIVE WRITING, M.F.A.

Summer Writers' Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:525:Sec.D1:01224 Writers House 302
6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F 10:00am-4:00pm
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. 31st Annual Summer Writers' Conference. Conference runs 6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F during the day. See website http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information. Cross-listed with 50:989:401, 50;989:402, 56:200:526, 50:200:527. An intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner, zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu.

Summer Writers' Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:526:Sec.D1:01225 Writers House 302
6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F 10:00am-4:00pm
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. 31st Annual Summer Writers' Conference. Conference runs 6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F during the day. See website http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information. Cross-listed with 50:989:401, 50;989:402, 56:200:525, 50:200:527. An intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner, zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu.

Summer Writers' Conference (Cr.3)
56:200:527:Sec.D1:02530 Writers House 302
6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F 10:00am-4:00pm
Zeidner, Lisa
Email: zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. 31st Annual Summer Writers' Conference. Conference runs 6/27-7/7 M,Tu,W,Th,F during the day. See website http://mfa.camden.rutgers.edu/writers-conference for more information. Cross-listed with 50:989:401, 50;989:402, 56:200:525, 50:200:526. An intensive series of workshops and readings that can be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit. Admission by permission--contact Conference Director Lisa Zeidner, zeidner@camden.rutgers.edu.

Special Topics Craft: Writing From Life (Cr.3)
56:200:571:Sec.A1:05218 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Grodstein, Lauren
Email: grodstein@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 56:606:610, 50:989:307. Online course in Sakai; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. This course encourages students to use their own memories to create fiction, nonfiction, and other literary forms. Students will read personal reporting covering a wide range of experiences, including war, travel, illness, heartbreak, and parenting, and learn ways to distill their own lives into narrative. Students are responsible for submitting four short pieces (3-5 pages) addressing episodes in their own lives, as well as posting Sakai responses to their reading.

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ENGLISH, M.A.

Special Topics: How to Read, Write, and Write About Texts (Cr.3)
56:350:593:Sec.D6:05104 ATG 226 and Sakai
6/27-7/21 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Barbarese, Joseph
Email: barbares@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with some online content. Go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Cross-listed with 50:350:392, 56:606:613. The course is designed for undergraduates and graduate students interested in engaging canonical and non-canonical texts as critics, scholars, creative writers, or just passionate readers. The course will concentrate on literatures in English and, in one or two cases, in translation, from the Romantic period through Post-Modernism, including long poems and novels (Eliot's The Wasteland, Stevens' "Sunday Morning," Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Morrison's Beloved; children's books such as Barrie's Peter Pan and Babbitt's Tuck Everlasting,) short lyrics and stories (poems by Wordsworth, Shelley, Arnold, Pound, Hart Crane, O'Hara, Plath and Sexton; short fiction by Melville, Chopin, Hemingway, O'Connor, Oates and Saunders), and major key historical documents (Lincoln's "Speech on the Dred Scott Decision," Nixon's "Checker's Speech," and others). Hybrid, with three online presentations. Two short papers and an in-class presentation.

Special Topics in American Literature: Women and Gender in Children's Literature (Cr.3)
56:352:593:Sec.A6:05111 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Singley, Carol
Email: singley@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai - go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. Cross-listed with 50:352:392,50:988:298,56:606:611. We read classic and contemporary children's literature, with a focus on women and gender. We explore work by male as well as female writers about girlhood and adolescence, and we pay critical attention to historical views of childhood and to literary forms and themes. Short papers and exercises, a presentation, and a longer paper or project.

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HISTORY, M.A.

Internship in Public History (Cr.BA)
56:512:699:Sec.T1:01642
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: jgolden@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Supervised work experience in a public history office or private institutional setting, involving project work for one semester or a summer.

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LIBERAL STUDIES, M.A.

Studies of Arts and Literature: Ceramic Sculpture (Cr.3)
56:606:608:Sec.A3:05629 FA 103
5/31-6/23 M,Tu,W,Th 1:40pm-4:20pm
Demaray, Elizabeth
Email: demaray@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:080:211. Materials fee of $40. This dynamic hands-on class utilizes hand-building, slab-building and glaze to author works of art in clay.  In this context students will also learn how to write about art while tracing the historic arc of this medium and actively participating in the innovations that are the hallmarks of modern day ceramics. The class will additionally consider nature of art as a medium for communication and the roll of the artist in society. Students need no prior background in art to take this class. For more information, see the instructor blog at http://demaray.camden.rutgers.edu.

Studies of Arts and Literature: New Media Art (Cr.3)
56:606:609:Sec.J1:05630 Sakai
7/25-8/17 Time by arrangement
Demaray, Elizabeth
Email: demaray@camden.rutgers.edu
Crosslisted with 50:080:224. Online course in Sakai format. $100 online course support fee. Go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. This class is dedicated to advancing the conceptual and practical uses of digital media in a fine arts context. Focused on a nexus of theory and studio-based work, the course utilizes much of the technology already available in our day-to-day lives to make video art, mash-ups, interactive media and web based artworks. New Media Art also offers the opportunity to actively participate in the innovations that are the hallmark of this new medium while tracing the historic significance of computing, hacktivism and shared interfaces. Students need no prior background in art to take this class. For more information, see the instructor blog at http://demaray.camden.rutgers.edu.

Studies of Arts and Literature: Writing From Life (Cr.3)
56:606:610:Sec.A1:05671 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Grodstein, Lauren
Email: grodstein@camden.rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 56:200:571, 50:989:307. Online course in Sakai; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. This course encourages students to use their own memories to create fiction, nonfiction, and other literary forms. Students will read personal reporting covering a wide range of experiences, including war, travel, illness, heartbreak, and parenting, and learn ways to distill their own lives into narrative. Students are responsible for submitting four short pieces (3-5 pages) addressing episodes in their own lives, as well as posting Sakai responses to their reading.

Studies of Arts and Literature: Women and Gender in Children's Literature (Cr.3)
56:606:611:Sec.A6:05119 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Singley, Carol
Email: singley@camden.rutgers.edu
COURSE CANCELLED 4/8.
Online course in Sakai - go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. Cross-listed with 50:352:392,50:988:298,56:352:593. We read classic and contemporary children's literature, with a focus on women and gender. We explore work by male as well as female writers about girlhood and adolescence, and we pay critical attention to historical views of childhood and to literary forms and themes. Short papers and exercises, a presentation, and a longer paper or project.

Special Topics: How to Read, Write, and Write About Texts (Cr.3)
56:606:612:Sec.D6:05107 ATG 226 and Sakai
6/27-7/21 M,Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Barbarese, Joseph
Email: barbares@camden.rutgers.edu
Hybrid course with some online content. Go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Cross-listed with 50:350:392, 56:350:593. The course is designed for undergraduates and graduate students interested in engaging canonical and non-canonical texts as critics, scholars, creative writers, or just passionate readers. The course will concentrate on literatures in English and, in one or two cases, in translation, from the Romantic period through Post-Modernism, including long poems and novels (Eliot's The Wasteland, Stevens' "Sunday Morning," Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Morrison's Beloved; children's books such as Barrie's Peter Pan and Babbitt's Tuck Everlasting,) short lyrics and stories (poems by Wordsworth, Shelley, Arnold, Pound, Hart Crane, O'Hara, Plath and Sexton; short fiction by Melville, Chopin, Hemingway, O'Connor, Oates and Saunders), and major key historical documents (Lincoln's "Speech on the Dred Scott Decision," Nixon's "Checker's Speech," and others). Hybrid, with three online presentations. Two short papers and an in-class presentation.

Studies of Politics and Society: Serial Killers (Cr.3)
56:606:621:Sec.HP:05219 eCollege
7/11-8/17 Time by arrangement
Caputo, Gail
Email: caputo@camden.rutgers.edu
Open MALS Online students and to other students with permission of the of the MALS director. Online course in eCollege; go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu. This course will explore the topic of serial murder, including motivations, methods, and types of killers, serial killer victims, as well as prosecution and social impact of serial homicide. Topics also include gender, race, myth and media. Case analysis of serial killers will be a central part of the class. The course incorporates academic and popular literature as well as film and official statistics.

Studies of Culture and Criticism: Anthropology of American Culture (Cr.3)
56:606:631:Sec.H6:05220 JBMDL and Sakai
7/11-8/17 W 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
McCarty, Patrick
Email: pmccarty@camden.rutgers.edu
Off-Campus course at Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lakehurst. Hybrid course in Sakai with partial online content; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. How do anthropologists understand culture? What is meant by an "Anthropology of American Culture"? Is it appropriate to speak of American culture? How does this approach compare to other disciplines in the Social Sciences? Where do we find 'American culture'? How are we a part of it? Can we study ourselves in an unbiased way? Have anthropologists from other countries studied "us"? This course will explore the nature of American culture–what holds it together and what divides it. Central to our study will be the examination and critique of current American images from popular culture. We will also draw connections between the various theoretical approaches and real life situations and other varied sources of knowledge about American culture. Where do we go to find sources of American culture? Who are some of the important writers on this subject, anthropologists or otherwise? Have we changed as a people since we became a nation? Do the insights of foreign observers help us to see ourselves and our culture more clearly? We will consult the writings of philosophers, historians, literary figures, and anthropologists to help answer these questions.

Philosophy and Religion: Social and Political Philosophy (Cr.3)
56:606:641:Sec.B6:05221 JBMDL and Sakai
5/31-7/7 W 6:00pm-9:40pm and time by arrangement
Betz, Margaret
Email: margbetz@camden.rutgers.edu
Off-Campus course at Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lakehurst. Hybrid course in Sakai with partial online content; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Course description forthcoming.

Studies in Non-Western Cultures and Societies: Health and Healing in Africa (Cr.3)
56:606:681:Sec.BP:05222 eCollege
5/31-7/7 Time by arrangement
Nicholson, Timothy
Email: nicholta@delhi.edu
Open MALS Online students and to other students with permission of the of the MALS director. Online course in eCollege; go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu. This class will use the concept of health and healing to examine larger social, economic and political trends in Africa. Focusing on diseases such as Ebola, HIV/AIDS and cholera, and by examining such topics as traditional healing, reproductive health and inoculations, this class will highlight changes and continuities that Africans experienced over the last two hundred years. A range of primary and secondary sources will be used to highlight African concerns , outside stereotypes, local responses to changing medical views and African agency with regard to health and healing. The class will link notions of health and healing with the colonial and postcolonial state and global changes. Students will be expected to post weekly forum responses, upload weekly small papers and develop an argumentative essay over the course of the class.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY, D.P.T.

Foundations I (Cr.1)
56:742:501:Sec.K1:01082 Stratford
5/31-8/5 Time by arrangement
Krencicki, Dennise and Handler, Jodi
Email: krencidb@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is a first in a series introducing the foundations of physical therapy education. This course introduces the basic principles of patient care involving the use of therapeutic massage. Emphasis is on a theoretical understanding of the physical principles of this intervention. A clinical problem solving approach is used to apply this knowledge. Students are introduced to Disablement Models, The Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and the Patient/Client Management Model. The course explores the concepts of evidence-based practice and identifies the steps that will assist them in evaluating clinically relevant research. Lecture and laboratory material are integrated through the use of patient cases. A self-taught module on medical terminology is also included in this course that will be guided and evaluated by course instructors.

Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Therapy I (Cr.3)
56:742:505:Sec.K1:01080 Stratford
5/31-8/5 Time by arrangement
Nardone, Marie Koval
Email: mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course introduces the student to the psychosocial aspects of physical therapy and to the clinical decision-making process which is utilized by the physical therapist. Patient and family members' responses to illness and loss are explored. Communication and interpersonal skills, and the ability to engage in reflective thinking are stressed. Lecture, discussion, role-playing, journal writing, written assignments, individual and group projects are utilized.

Human Anatomy (Cr.5)
56:742:510:Sec.K1:01081 Stratford
5/31-8/5 Time by arrangement
Speirs, Michael and Ferraro, Richard
Email: ferrarra@shrp.rutgers.edu
Regional study of gross structure of the human body with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system.

Scientific Inquiry (Cr.3)
56:742:614:Sec.B1:01141 Stratford
5/31-7/7 Time by arrangement
Bross, Theodore and Ferraro, Richard
Email: ferrarra@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts underlying the research process. Basic concepts of research design and approaches are examined in answering clinically relevant questions. Applied statistics are discussed. An overview of the knowledge and skills necessary for the student to critically analyze the literature is emphasized in the format of lecture, discussion, classroom assignments, and modified case studies. Whenever possible, computer applications will be introduced as will examples from the health research literature.

Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy II (Cr.2)
56:742:616:Sec.B1:00441 Stratford
5/31-7/7 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email: dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an integrated consideration of the medical science of cardiopulmonary care and the evaluation and treatment techniques as they pertain to physical therapy practice It is a continuation of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy I with a focus on advanced topics in cardiopulmonary physical therapy including dysrhythmia interpretation, acute and intensive care rehabilitation, mechanical ventilation, and managing the medically complex individual.

Medical Considerations in Rehabilitation III (Cr.2)
56:742:618:Sec.B1:01127 Stratford
5/31-7/7 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email: dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is the third course in the Medical Considerations in Rehabilitation series and is constructed of lectures on a variety of medical topics. Students gain an understanding of infectious diseases, endocrine disorders, nutritional supplements, ergogenic aides, basic medical screening, lab values, oncology, mental illness, and substance abuse. The basic pharmacologic management and medical interventions pertaining to these conditions are emphasized in conjunction with the impact on physical therapy interventions.

Clinical Education I (Cr.3)
56:742:619:Sec.H1:00442 Stratford
7/11-8/17 Time by arrangement
Krencicki, Dennise and Simonds, Adrienne
Email: krencidb@shrp.rutgers.edu
Full time internship to provide experience in a clinical setting in one of the following areas: acute care, adult or pediatric rehabilitation (hospital based or outpatient), orthopedic or other clinical setting that may include a special interest practice. The clinical experience is 6 weeks full-time. Internships are located at contracted clinical facilities in New Jersey and throughout the United States.

Clinical Education I (Cr.3)
56:742:619:Sec.H2:02449 Stratford
7/11-8/17 Time by arrangement
Krencicki, Dennise and Simonds, Adrienne
Email: simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
Full time internship to provide experience in a clinical setting in one of the following areas: acute care, adult or pediatric rehabilitation (hospital based or outpatient), orthopedic or other clinical setting that may include a special interest practice. The clinical experience is 6 weeks full-time. Internships are located at contracted clinical facilities in New Jersey and throughout the United States.

Professional Issues I (Cr.2)
56:742:630:Sec.C1:01126 Stratford
5/31-7/22 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Email: simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
Introduction to the profession of physical therapy. Discussion of issues including the development and history of the profession and professional association, review of professional licensure, introduction to health professionals and other legal practice issues. Includes an introduction to clinical education.

Differential Diagnosis and Medical Screening (Cr.2)
56:742:701:Sec.C1:01235 Stratford
5/31-7/22 Time by arrangement
Kietrys, David
Email: keitrydm@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course is designed to prepare the student to practice physical therapy in primary care or autonomous practice settings through an in-depth look at the science of medical screening and differential diagnosis. The course incorporates screening tools previously learned across the curriculum with an emphasis on pathology and identification of disease states which may fall outside of the scope of physical therapy practice.

Education (Cr.2)
56:742:702:Sec.C1:01236 Stratford
5/31-7/22 Time by arrangement
Nardone, Marie Koval and Handler, Jodi
Email: mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course facilitates the development of teaching and learning skills. Students learn theoretical concepts of education and practical applications. Lecture, discussion, journal writing, written assignments, individual and group projects and presentations are utilized.

Wellness and Health (Cr.2)
56:742:716:Sec.C1:01237 Stratford
5/31-7/22 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an in-depth look at the concepts of health promotion, secondary prevention, and wellness as it applies to healthy individuals as well as individuals with chronic disease and disability. Students are instructed in the skills required to research, design, and implement wellness programs aimed at prevention of disease and disability.

Medical Considerations in Rehabilitation IV (Cr.2)
56:742:717:Sec.C1:01238 Stratford
5/31-7/22 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Email: simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
This course provides an understanding of the pathophysiology and medical science of the disorders of the integumentary system (wound and burn care), endocrine and metabolic systems (diabetes, obesity), renal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and hepatic disorders. The course considers autoimmune and infectious diseases (HIV and AIDs), the relationship between the medical interventions, including pharmacology, and the impact on physical therapy is discussed.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T1:01234 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Cohen, Evan
Email: cohenet@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T2:01324 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Dekerlegand, Robert
Email: dekerlro@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T3:01323 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Ferraro, Richard
Email: ferrarra@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T4:01355 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Kietrys, David
Email: keitrydm@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T5:01584 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Staff
Email: mnardone@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

Applied Research III (Cr.1)
56:742:735:Sec.T6:01852 Stratford
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
Simonds, Adrienne
Email: simondad@shrp.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Students complete a comprehensive, concisely written and well-conceived poster presentation that represents the results of the systematic review conducted in previous semesters. Students are required to present and defend the presentation during the DPT Program's Research Day.

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EXECUTIVE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Organizational Behavior (Cr.3)
56:831:505:Sec.A1:02464 Avalon
6/6-6/10 Time by arrangement
Olshfski, Dorothy
Email: olshfski@gmail.com
Open only to EMPA Cohort students. Off-Campus course at the Golden Inn in Avalon, NJ. Course fee of $750. Note special schedule. This course examines organizational and individual responses to ethical issues at work. The class will use cases, interviews, film and lecture to explore problematic situations through the different lenses employed in the ethics literature.

Research Workshop (Cr.3)
56:831:675:Sec.T1:02451 Avalon
5/31-8/17 Time by arrangement
McGuire, Angie
Email: angmcg@docs.rutgers.edu
Open only to EMPA Cohort students. Students register for the capstone requirement as part of the Summer program, however, the course runs through the remainder of the Fall semester. The final capstone paper will reflect and integrate concepts covered in all courses. Guides students in formulating, researching and writing a capstone research paper. Integrates the skills and concepts from the core courses as students use quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze a selected policy or administrative problem.

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PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION, M.P.A.

Organizational Behavior(Cr.3)
56:834:505:Sec.A1:05528 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Blessett, Brandi
Email: bb520@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. Examines organizational behavior of individuals and groups/teams and the organizational context in which that behavior takes place. Organizational theories and behavioral theories and approaches are discussed, including seminal historical works and more current treatments.

Public and Non-Profit Management (Cr.3)
56:834:525:Sec.D1:03883 Sakai
6/27-7/21 Time by arrangement
Mareschal, Patricia
Email: marescha@camden.rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. This course examines contemporary management approaches, techniques, and skills for managing various kinds of public organizations. Decision making, administrative leadership, planning, implementation, evaluation, and ethics are key topics.

Public Administration in Germany - Learning Abroad (Cr.3)
56:834:531:Sec.D6:05635 ATG 201 and Germany
6/27-6/30 in class meetings M,Tu,W,Th; trip 7/3-7/13; one meeting week of July 18.
Fletcher, Natasha
Email: natasha.fletcher@rutgers.edu
Cross-listed with 50:975:351. International trip to Germany. Additional costs apply - contact instructor for more information. Students will require valid passport. This course will teach students about the characteristics of urban Germany such as housing, infrastructure, arts and culture, and urban issues. Students will explore 3 major cities in Germany on foot, by train, trolley, subway and boat to gain insight into the social-, economical-, and political culture of urban Germany. After 4 pre-departure class meetings at Rutgers-Camden where students will learn about urban Germany (through selected readings, discussions, assignments, and instruction), they will have knowledge of: gentrification, community development, social movements such as Right to City, Autonomous Scene, street art & graffiti, and more. The intellectual preparation coupled with useful information about the German culture and customs prepares students for the 9-day journey through Germany where we will explore the topics discussed in class “hands-on” through site visits, lectures, and city tours. The city is our classroom! We will spend 3 days in each city, beginning with Berlin in the East, then traveling by train to Hamburg in the North, and finally Köln in the Northwest. The class will meet for a 3-hour post-departure debriefing meeting. Highlights of the trip include visits to the (former) wall in Berlin, the Brandenburg gate, the Kreuzberg and Prenzlauer Berg neighborhoods in Berlin, the Köln cathedral (the “Church of Germany”, a UNESCO world-heritage site, gothic cathedral built in the middle-ages, house to the reliquary of the Three Kings), boat tours on the Spree and Alster rivers, a visit to the Port of Hamburg and the Reeperbahn and Blankenese neighborhoods, various museum visits, concert or opera or ballet and theatre performances, good food, interaction with locals, and much more.

Internship I (Cr.3)
56:834:541:Sec.B1:04001
5/31-7/7 Time by arrangement
Serico, Joseph
Email: jserico@camden.rutgers.edu
By permission of instructor. Direct experience with public agencies; individual internships, under faculty supervision, in policymaking agencies.

Financial Management for Public Programs (Cr.3)
56:834:553:Sec.A6:05397 Sakai
5/31-6/23 Time by arrangement
Hayes, Michael
Email: michael.hayes@rutgers.edu
Online course in Sakai; go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Online course support fee of $100. Examines the application of budgeting, costs, term financing, and investment management practices, and the importance of the accounting, reporting, and auditing functions.

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SOCIAL WORK, M.S.W.

Clinical Social Work: Health(Cr.3)
19:910CM:516:Sec.W6:05409 CSW B110
7/11-8/17 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Persson, Deborah
Email: dpersson70@aol.com
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the professional foundation courses. Problem-solving model of direct practice is applied at an advanced level for individuals, families, and groups in health care settings. Skills of crisis intervention, case management, and discharge planning addressed. Professional practice as part of an interdisciplinary team.

Social Welfare Policy and Service II: Health and Aging(Cr.3)
19:910CM:542:Sec.B6:05410 CSW 212
5/31-7/7 Tu,Th 6:00pm-9:40pm
Bailey, Tara
Email: tara.bailey@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the professional foundation courses. Models of policy analysis applied to understanding the strengths and limitations of the U.S. health care system and services, as well as policies, programs, and services for the aging population. Addresses understanding of values and sociopolitical forces that define problems, affected populations, current policies and programs and their impact, service delivery and resource allocation, unmet needs, trends and analysis of political processes, and change strategies.

HBSE: Loss Across the Lifespan(Cr.3)
19:910CM:547:Sec.W6:05495 CSW 212
7/11-8/17 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm
Miller, Alisa
Email: alisagriefspecialist@gmail.com
Pre-requisite: 19:910:500 and 502. Addresses many types of loss that occur across the life span and incorporates a developmental approach to loss and grief.

HBSE: Violence and Abuse in Childhood(Cr.3)
19:910CM:567:Sec.U1:05411 CSW B110 and eCollege
5/31-8/5 Saturdays 6/4, 6/11, 7/9, 7/30 9:00am-4:00pm and time by arrangement.
Hiraldo, Bernardo
Email: bernardo.hiraldo@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: 19:910:500 and 502. Hybrid course in eCollege with some online content; go to http://ecollege.rutgers.edu. Note special schedule. Examines the definitions, scope, and impact of violence and abuse in childhood. Explores the spectrum of theories and conceptual frameworks used to explain violence. In particular, the course focuses on the prevalence, etiology, myths, and dynamics of child physical abuse, childhood neglect, child sexual abuse, sibling abuse, and trafficking. Perspectives on working with both victims/survivors and perpetrators are presented, with an understanding of the role of culture and environmental context. The course includes a review of the conceptual frameworks used to guide current services, interventions, prevention efforts, and policies aimed at remedying and eliminating violence against children in our society. A special emphasis is placed on the advocacy role of the social worker in creating social change.

Social Welfare Policy and Service II(Cr.3)
19:910CM:585:Sec.P6:05412 CSW B110
5/31-7/7 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm
Torres, Cheryl
Email: cheryl.torres@rutgers.edu
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the professional foundation courses. Models of policy analysis applied to children and family issues and problems. Addresses understanding of values and sociopolitical forces that define problems; affected populations; current policies and programs and their impact; service delivery and resource allocation; unmet needs; trends; analysis of political processes and change strategies; and the role of evaluation.

Methods of Social Work Research II(Cr.3)
19:910CM:595:Sec.P7:01560 CSW 212
5/31-7/7 M,W 6:00pm-9:40pm
Kim, Sung-Ju
Email: skim@monmouth.edu
Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the professional foundation courses. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of agency programs and individual practice. Participation in hands-on, small-group research projects to cover all phases of the research process and use of computer technology.

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MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING SPANISH (MAT)

Spanish Literature for Teachers: Spanish and Latin American World Masterpieces of the Twentieth Century (Cr.3)
56:940:523:Sec.J6:05651 ATG 218 and Sakai
7/25-8/17 W 6:00pm-8:40pm and time by arrangement
Castillo, Mauricio
Email: mauricio.a.castillo@rutgers.edu
Hybrid course in Sakai with some online component: go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Cross-listed with 50:940:491. Transatlantic in focus, the class studies critically-acclaimed novels, poems, and short stories from both Latin America and Spain. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding on the texts and the literary, historical, and cultural movements that produced in order to better comprehend the authors and their works. All readings, discussions, and papers are in Spanish.

Special Topics in Teaching Spanish: Peer Interaction in the Foreign-Language Classroom (Cr.3)
56:940:592:Sec.B7:05652 ATG 218 and Sakai
5/31-7/7 W 6:00pm-8:40pm and time by arrangement
Moranski, Kara
Email: moranski@sas.upenn.edu
Hybrid course in Sakai with some online component: go to http://sakai.rutgers.edu. Cross-listed with 50:940:492. This course will examine the evidence supporting contemporary best practices for designing and facilitating pair and small-group interactions in the foreign-language classroom. Recent classroom-based research will serve as a basis from which to explore how various interactional patterns correlate with subsequent language-learning outcomes. Students will investigate the concepts of active learning, inverted classroom models, in-group power dynamics, and analytical talk in the L1, all within the context of classroom social settings. This course will also consider the numerous cultural, environmental, and individual factors that contribute to learners? in-group behavior. Students in this hybrid course will take a highly active role in their own learning process as they apply novel developments from the field of second-language acquisition to (1) reflect upon and critically examine their existing beliefs and experiences with classroom peer interaction and to (2) apply insights gained to their own Spanish language teaching and assessment practices.

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